Posts Tagged ‘Three Sisters’

Golden Decade Students of Ansel Adams Vintage Prints Exhibited at Bolinas Museum

March 7th, 2020

Golden Decade Students of Ansel Adams Show Vintage Contact Prints for the First Time Ever at the Bolinas Museum

January 25 – March 22, 2020

Apologies for the short notice, but this show is well worth going to if you are going anywhere. At least there will not be a crowd. Use your own judgment and be safe.

Sunken Wrecked Car Body, Tidal Pool, Sausalito, Marin County, California, 1948 by Philip Hyde. This photograph is in the Bolinas Museum show. (Click to enlarge.)

All of Ansel Adams’ students at the California School of Fine Arts, now the San Francisco Art Institute, learned to make darkroom silver prints and to fine tune their print enlargements by first printing 5X7 and 4X5 contact prints. Ansel Adams also produced contact prints, as did returning guest luminaries Edward Weston, Dorothea Lange, and Imogen Cunningham, as well as lead instructor Minor White and others.

Early students in the photography program, the first of it’s kind to teach creative photography as a profession, included my father Philip Hyde, Pirkle Jones, Ruth-Marion Baruch, Gerald Ratto, David Johnson, Bill Heick, Benjamen Chinn, Cameron Macauley, Stan Zrnich, Charles Wong, Ira Latour, and others. Not all of these mentioned are featured in the Bolinas Museum show, but a number of the student’s vintage contact prints in the exhibition have never been shown before. This is largely due to a knowledgeable curator, Jennifer O’Keeffe, who now teaches history of photography at San Francisco Art Institute, presumably in the same department Adams founded.

Contact prints are the closest representation of what the photographer sees, pointed out O’Keefe to the San Francisco Chronicle Datebook. Dad used to say a contact print is the positive image of the original negative with no enlargement. Datebook, SF Gate, rarely writes about art shows, unless the artist is internationally known, historically significant or creates something else unusual. Of all the students at the California School of Fine Arts from the first decade, that is, what is now called the Golden Decade, only about 10 are still living. They are all over 90. There are six still doing well and living in the Bay Area. Philip Hyde passed on in 2006 at age 84. He was born in San Francisco and lived in other Bay Area cities with his family as a boy and on his own including San Rafael, Berkeley, Daily City and elsewhere in Northern California before living out his years in the Northern Sierra Nevada Mountains in a wilderness home he built.

Hyde teamed up with many other Bay Area conservationists including David Brower, Ken Brower, Ansel Adams, Martin Litton, Dave Bohn, Tris Coffin and photographers Edward Weston, Brett Weston, Cole Weston, Wynn Bullock, William Garnett, Richard Norgaard, Ed Cooper and others to produce the Exhibit Format Series for Sierra Club Books. The Sierra Club Books Exhibit Format Series spearheaded many of the campaigns that made our Western national parks. One Bay Area Landmark close to Bolinas on the Marin County Coast is Point Reyes National Seashore. Philip Hyde’s book, Island in Time: The Point Reyes Peninsula with text by Harold Gilliam, landed on the desk of every member of Congress and other Washington leaders, while sales of the second edition raised the funds necessary to buy up the remaining ranches on Point Reyes to keep them out of the hands of developers.

Philip Hyde, in the process of working on wilderness campaigns all over the West often supported local conservation organizations like Friends of the Three Sisters Wilderness in Eugene, Oregon, The Seattle Mountaineers and others, not to mention many national organizations as well, including the Wilderness Society, National Audubon, the Izaak Walton League and many others.

To support grassroots mobilization efforts, Philip Hyde sent his early silver prints, sometimes for display, sometimes as press prints. Over more than 60 years of full-time photography for conservation, he made hundreds of thousands of silver prints total, but this broke down to only about six or less of each image. During photography school, he made two to four contact prints of each photograph he printed. From those he got a sense of what he wanted to emphasize in each photograph when he dodged, burned and worked up larger prints. He usually made 8X10s next, then 10X13s, 11X14s, 16X20s, 20X24s and 40X50s. Fewer and fewer images made the cut to print at the larger and largest sizes. Hyde also had a 10½ foot X 14 foot sink. He made 10X14 foot darkroom silver prints in it for the Oakland Museum Natural Sciences Wing, one of the earliest exhibitions of it’s kind with giant murals behind the displays. The Oakland Museum only this last decade finally replaced these displays.

Philip Hyde has always been known for bringing an artist’s training and sensibilities to documentary photography. Some of his early black and white photographs show the influence of his mentors Edward Weston and Ansel Adams, but as Hyde’s career developed, he became a mentor himself through his books and teaching workshops. Philip Hyde led the first Ansel Adams Color Workshop and many others. His work became a model: lifestyle, methods and images. Many Americans today do not necessarily know Philip Hyde’s name, but they have usually seen his iconic Western landscapes. Hyde’s classic views, which in some cases he either photographed first or popularized the most through his large format nature books, have become bucket list photograph locations for social media adventurers and part of the lexicon for landscape photography.

Many of Hyde’s classmates have attained similar levels of recognition. A number of the names above participated in the famous Family of Man exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Pirkle Jones, Gerald Ratto, David Johnson, Ira Latour, Bill Heick and others have all had nationally acclaimed shows in major museums and galleries, have published books and been written about by the most eminent magazines and newspapers. After the self-published version of the book, The Golden Decade: Photography at the California School of Fine Arts came out in 2010 numerous prominent museums and galleries exhibited the Golden Decade photographers. The shows were popular and well attended. For example, at the Golden Decade Exhibition at Smith Andersen North over 500 people showed up for the opening. More recently after Steidl published the book, there were more gallery and museum shows, as well as book signings with the photographers and editors Ken Ball and Victoria Whyte-Ball, daughter of Don Whyte. See Bolinas Museum Golden Decade Show for more details.

Bolinas Museum

48 Wharf Road
Post Office Box 450
Bolinas, California 94924

415-868-0330

Main Gallery:

THE GOLDEN DECADE: Photography at the California School of Fine Arts, 1945-1955

January 25 – March 22, 2020

Museum Hours:
Friday 1 – 5 PM
Saturday 12 – 5 PM
Sunday 12 – 5 PM

Office Hours:
Tuesday – Friday 9 AM – 5 PM

Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 1

March 29th, 2010

Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log: June 14-September 14, 1971 By Ardis Hyde

(Ardis, David and Philip Hyde in Their Avion Camper on a GMC 3/4 ton Utility Body Pickup)

Part One: Northern California to British Columbia

Mt. Lassen from Manzanita Lake, Lassen Volcanic National Park, California by Philip Hyde.

(See photograph full screen: Click Here.)

June 14:  Left home at 8:15 am. Sunny with scattered puffy clouds. North to Susanville, through Adin to Alturas. Brief lunch stop along roadside. David piled out with his “new” twin lens reflex camera (out of commission) and tripod Philip gave him. David’s purpose was to “take pictures of flowers.” Marvelous to behold David’s detailed imitations of his father. He woke up knowing this was the day we were leaving for Alaska. “My head is shaking because I’m so excited.” The land showed beautiful lush green evidence of the wet season we’ve had. The pluvial lakes were all extra high as well as many no-name lakes in low places. Farm country, range cattle and open space. First open range, bluffs of lava flows, then into lodgepole pine forest. Spent the night at Lava Butte, Oregon in the planted pine forest for possible pics in the morning. The Three Sisters, Bachelor Butte, Mt. Brokeoff all snow-covered.

June 15:  Woke up about 6 am and drove up toward the top of Lava Butte, but the gate was closed until 9:30 am. Started out on foot, David and Philip with their cameras and tripods over their shoulders. A park ranger stopped and gave us a ride to the top. On foot again we circled the crater, David and Philip taking pictures of good views of the peaks including Mt. Shasta and Mt. Theilsen. Into Bend, Oregon to Jerry’s Trailer Supply to see about repairing the Camper’s Monomatic Toilet that had been leaking. Philip bought the faulty valve and repaired the toilet himself. I grocery shopped in the meantime. North to Madras where we turned into the Warm Springs Reservation to go swimming at Ka-Nee-Ta again. David enthusiastic and worked hard practicing swimming. Leaving the reservation we were treated to masses of wild flowers in all directions: Mules Ears or Wyethia especially abundant, lupine and buckwheat grass lush everywhere. Snow-topped Mt. Jefferson was glorious. North to Dalles Bridge. Wheat fields turning gold. David woke up from a nap in his bunk over the cab, just as we crossed the Columbia River, looking upstream at Celilo Dam (Dalles Dam) that submerged the once mighty Celilo Falls. After dinner we drove on to Yakima State Park, Washington, on the banks of the Yakima River.

June 16:  Before leaving Yakima State Park, David had a swing and play on the equipment nearby. Beautiful clear morning going over Snoqualmie Pass. Cold, lots of old snow, some fog on top. Into Seattle traffic lineup across Lake Washington floating bridge. Into worse congestion trying to reach parking lot at Seattle Center.  Finally found our way around traffic by going way around Queen Anne Hill to get to the other side of the city. We rode downtown on the Monorail. Shopped at the REI Coop, then returned to Seattle Center. We walked through the Fire Engine Museum. David chose a fire engine to ride on in the nearby concession. Just made it to Mukeliteo in time to get on the ferry to Columbia Beach on Whidbey Island. We drove the length of Whidbey Island in late sunlight to Deception Bay State Park (Deception Pass State Park). At Deception Bay State Park we ate a quick dinner at Rosario Beach while watching a couple put on all their diving equipment. We walked down the beach and around the headland as we had on a previous visit. David enjoyed the tide pools and rock scrambling.

June 17:  Caught the 8 am ferry from Anacortes. Another perfect sunny day with the water glassy and smooth. Ferry stopped at Lopez Island and Orcas Island, then on to Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. At Sidney, Vancouver Island, no trouble with customs. They only wanted to know about stone fruits and didn’t want to look into anything else. In Victoria we parked downtown and walked to the harbor, tourist information and the Provincial Museum. Also parked on Government Street and looked around in the shops. Parking lots and streets were nearly empty. Canadians very pleasant and the lack of automobile traffic is refreshing. The Provincial Museum exhibited Indian Canoes, Totem Poles, Lodges and many other artifacts. We bought David a small hand-carved dugout canoe.

June 18:  North up Vancouver Island on Canada Route 1 in intermittent rain. Drove into Goldstream Park to admire the lush, undisturbed rain forest. Around Comax, development has reduced the charm and the natural setting. Pulled into Miracle Beach Campground. Picked out a campsite on Maple Lane. They were all like private rooms with leafy walls and ceiling. Rain stopped, so we cooked hotdogs over alder wood fire. We walked out to the beach of large pebbles and many driftwood logs. Coming back we wound around a network of trails through the woods. The wild roses were the largest we have ever seen, as big as Philip’s hand. Found a flame-colored honeysuckle, foam flower and other delicate white blossoms in the deep shade. Mosquitoes are bad here.

June 19: At Black Creek we stopped to walk along driftwood on the beach and rocks of the breakwater out to an old ship hull beached in the sand. David was singing and beachcombing along the way. Soon his pockets were bulging with crab skeletons, shells and driftwood.  When we returned to the Camper, he arranged them in a display in his “studio.” David sleeps in the bed above the cab and rides up there sometimes while we are driving. He calls it his “studio.” He is also very busy building a float plane with Nuts and Bolts and a ferry and a fire boat out of Lego. Lunch at Elk Falls in Strathcona Provincial Park. Philip walked to the overlook. He said there was only a trickle of water because it had been diverted for the hydro-electric works. Up to Middle Lake and across the crest of the mountains. Everywhere logging and fire scars but many small lakes covered with blooming water lilies. Some light rain, but a stiff south wind raised the clouds until we could see the snow patched mountain peaks. The Strait of Georgia narrows and the opposite shore was close, with the dark red vertical faces of the mountains, and forests on their layered shelves, all easily visible. Made another stop for the view down into Crown and Zellerback’s Duncan Bay Mill and Pulp Plant, a vast layout of mill, plant, sawdust barges, log booms and machinery with lots of activity and smoke emissions. No road sign for Morton Lake Park, missed it completely and the town too. Signs and even towns not visible where they were shown on the map, we’ve found is typical of British Columbia. Ended up camping in a gravel pit on the left side of the road. At least David had a big pile of white sand to play in.

June 20:  The Canadian ferry at Kelsey Bay depends on tides for its arrival and departure times…

(CONTINUED IN THE BLOG POST, “Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 2.”