Posts Tagged ‘Sustainable’

Genesee Valley Ranch Agreement Brings Major Publishing Credits

December 28th, 2020

Forbes Magazine, Food & Wine and Others Publish David Leland Hyde Photographs With Articles About the Genesee Valley Ranch

Ranch Manager Connecting With Wagyu Cows, Winter, Genesee Valley Ranch, Sierra Nevada Mountains, California by David Leland Hyde. A print of this photograph appeared in the exhibition, “Agriculture West and Midwest” at the Plumas County Museum. It has also been the most widely used photograph in articles and other PR efforts on behalf of the ranch. Special thanks to Ranch Manager Michele Haskins and to the Palmaz Family. (Click 3X to See Large.)

Living in the Lost Sierra Northern California paradise that I do, I am fortunate to be surrounded by forests and mountain valleys where agriculture operates on a small scale. Here ranchers raise cattle and other livestock nearly all grass fed, the meat produced is “all natural” by default, and ranchers and farmers use zero to far fewer pesticides and other poisons, GMO or growth hormones such as rBGH and rbST.

This does not mean mountain valley living and agriculture are idyllic by any means, as many of the benefits mentioned above make the business more challenging in many ways, especially on small ranches in remote areas. In addition, profitable enterprises here not only have all the challenges found elsewhere, but must deal with the difficulties of cold, snowy winters, long and distant supply chains, sometimes unreliable food supplies, rugged terrain, inclement weather and far away veterinarian services.

Agrarian entrepreneurs in the mountains must innovate or die. As a result, here in Northeastern California, farms and ranches have developed and combined different approaches than used anywhere else in the world. For example: many of our producers are involved in a combination of farm-to-table and more traditional distribution models.

Many Plumas and Sierra County ranchers winter their cattle at lower elevations, often in the San Joaquin Valley or Sacramento Valley. This requires unusual partnerships and lease arrangements.

Surprisingly, with more people getting out of agriculture than into it, the Palmaz Family, known for the Palmaz Heart Stent, invented by Julio Palmaz, and Palmaz Vineyards in Napa, among other enterprises, in 2016 purchased Genesee Valley Ranch, just a few miles up the road from my home. The Genesee Valley Ranch was first homesteaded as the Hosselkus Ranch. The Hosselkus Ranch was historically significant to the area during the California Gold Rush as a stage stop and way station for travelers across the Sierra to the Central Valley and the rest of the California Gold Country. It was a cattle ranch predominantly, but also raised other livestock such as goats and hogs. The ranch changed hands a number of times after the original Hosselkus family owned it. Charles Clay and his family owned the ranch for most of the second half of the 20th Century, with Paul Neff purchasing it in 1992. It has been leased to cattle grazing off and on, but not run as a cattle ranch since the 1800s.

Cousins of the Napa Palmaz Family have been in ranching in South America since the 1940s. Julio Palmaz’ son Christian Gastón Palmaz said as a family they had always seen ranching as a healthy happy way to live. Christian remembers his time on ranches as a boy as some of his fondest memories. As a family they wanted a place to get away to and wanted to get back into ranching, but to do it differently than most commercial spreads and more like other small operations in the High Sierra. More importantly, Palmaz Vineyards had become known for sustainable and ecologically friendly practices at the Winery in Napa. The family wanted to continue that tradition by raising organic grass-fed and grass-finished beef, followed by potential diversification into other organic livestock and crops. In researching cattle breeds, they ran across Japanese Wagyu, a.k.a. Kobe Beef Cattle. One main advantage to Wagyu cows is that they are hearty and do well in cold and snow. This means the Genesee Valley Ranch does not have to send cows out to winter elsewhere. Wagyu is just catching on in the US. So far it is more popular in the Rocky Mountain States and in the Midwest. As of yet there are still few purveyors on the West Coast.

Besides the Wagyu Beef, Genesee Valley Ranch Manager, Michele Haskins, has a five-year rollout plan for a community gardens and a diversity of farm animals and other “natural” interdependencies and intercropping that will help fend off disease and other pests naturally. The Genesee Store, right on the ranch property, has now been completely converted into a full-service fine dining restaurant, with a state of the art kitchen, bathrooms, ADA access and other amenities. The Genesee Store serves Genesee Valley Ranch Grass Fed Beef, the main ingredient of many items on the menu. Ranch plans also include renovating the barns, creamery, stables and other outbuildings. Eventually they hope to make cheese at the Genesee Valley Ranch to be sold at the Palmaz Vineyards in Napa.

Genesee Valley Ranch is evolving to be just as high tech as the winery, which hosts the world’s first sustainable high tech wine cave with zero water waste. GVR uses aerial infrared technology to monitor pastures to move the cattle around thereby evenly grazing the native grasses and naturally keeping pests such as Star Thistle at bay. Meanwhile, the ranch hires local experts, cowhands and restaurant staff. Despite this focus on helping the local economy, directly benefiting local workers and letting local emergency EMTs and EVAC Helicopters land and take off at the GVR helipad in emergencies, a small handful of people in Genesee opposed the Palmaz use of their helicopter to travel to and from the ranch and to do their infrared pasture mapping. This minor dust up has all been resolved now. If you want to read more about it, you can do that elsewhere. I wrote a defense of the family myself in the local paper and in Plumas News. By far, the majority of people in Plumas County and in Genesee itself support the Palmaz Family and their cattle ranching outfit.

After I professed my support of the ranch and the family’s organic approach, the family invited me out to the big ranch house for more than one meal. Christian Palmaz and I went to lunch at Young’s Market in Taylorsville and other local hangouts as well. At one of our fun meet ups, I showed Christian my raw files that I had just photographed of the ranch. He was impressed. He also read and shared with the rest of his family one of my articles about my father Philip Hyde and his conservation photography that helped make many of the national parks of the West. Julio Palmaz sent me a photograph of himself reading Drylands: The Deserts of North America by Philip Hyde. How fun and cool is that? Meanwhile, when Christian saw my raw files and read my article about Dad, he said he wanted me to photograph for the ranch. He also wanted to acquire a license to use my previous landscape photographs of the area. I have been photographing Genesee since 2009. I was more than happy to have my images put to use for a good cause. Little did I know what a win it would be for my career, as well as for the ranch. The Palmaz marketing staff put my photographs up on the Genesee Store, Club Brasas Food and Wine Society and Genesee Valley Ranch websites. They also often use my images in other outreach and in articles in the mainstream press.

Genesee Valley Ranch has now been written up in a good number of national magazines and my photographs have been the main visual compliment to the articles. Forbes Magazine did a beautiful feature you can read online called, “How Tech Developed for a Vineyard Is Helping This Grass-Fed Cattle Ranch Grow,” by Bridget Shirvell. Two of my photographs appear in the piece, one as the header image. Foodie magazine favorite Food & Wine did an article headed with my photograph of the ranch manager connecting to the Wagyu cows (see above). Food & Wine appropriately titled the feature, “The Cattle at This Zen California Ranch Basically Run the Joint: Genesee Valley Ranch Takes Every Possible Step to be Extremely Respectful of Their Cows,” by Kristy Mucci. Southbay Magazine’s feature article, “Raising the Steaks” cannot be found online, but write-ups about it appear on the Palmaz Vineyards Blog, Genesee Valley Ranch Blog, Club Brasas Blog and on Moontide Media online. The luxury lifestyle magazine, Iconic Life, recently ran an article titled, “A Choice Cut: The Best of American Wagyu Beef,” by Laura Baddish. Iconic Life used five of my photographs of Genesee Valley and the Genesee Store. Golden State magazine also used four of my photographs in their article, “In the Hills That Sparked the Gold Rush, Genesee Valley Ranch Is Raising a Special Breed of Cattle.”

At the Genesee Store, when it opens inside again after the Covid-19 pandemic settles down, you can also view my landscape photographs of the ranch on slow rotation on a giant closed circuit TV while you enjoy their choice prime cuts of organic beef and other delicious natural and organic fare in sight of the mountains and green pastures where the Wagyu roam. Stop in some time at 7201 Genesee Road and have a bite or currently get a meal to go. You will be very glad you did. Call the store for hours and reservations at 530-280-0300. During the pandemic you can get curbside takeout and take and bake as well by calling or visiting Geneseestore.com.

Renowned Photographers Son Carries on Historic Legacy With the Art of Small Agriculture

August 2nd, 2018

For Immediate Release

August 2, 2018

Contact Info:

Scott Lawson or Paul Russell
530-283-6320
pcmuseum [at] psln [dot] com

David Leland Hyde
info [at] hydefineart [dot] com

Renowned Photographer’s Son Carries on Historic Legacy With the Art of Small Agriculture

Dogs, Farm Hand, Horse, Overlees Farm Near Franklin, Nebraska, 2015 by David Leland Hyde. (Click on image to see large.)

Even if some Americans today do not recognize his name, most are familiar with Philip Hyde’s iconic 1960s and 1970s natural landscapes that appeared in a solo show at the Smithsonian, spearheaded conservation campaigns to establish many US national parks and helped popularize the large coffee table photography book. With Bob Moon, Philip Hyde also co-founded the Plumas County Museum, which now fittingly will host the first show of David Leland Hyde’s exhibition, “Agriculture West and Midwest: Visual Stories of a Fading Way of Life from 17 States with Special Emphasis on Sierra County and Plumas County,” from September 7 through December 29, 2018.

David Leland Hyde set out to make historically significant, yet aesthetic and artful photographs to preserve the memory of barns, farms and ranches that are vanishing all over the country. He also has brought out some of the differences between industrial agriculture and more sustainable or traditional methods. The art of agriculture is also a rich tradition itself, particularly going back to the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression. Hyde said one of his father’s teachers from photography school, Dorothea Lange, has had a profound influence on his work and on the genre. Ansel Adams, who founded the photography program at the California School of Fine Arts, now the San Francisco Art Institute, Minor White, the lead instructor and other renowned guest lecturers such as Edward Weston and Imogen Cunningham photographed agriculture. Also another Adams protégé, Morley Baer photographed barns in California particularly well, as did Carr Clifton, a neighbor and protégé of Philip Hyde.

Philip Hyde himself photographed cauliflower field’s and other agrarian subjects in a number of Bay Area Counties as early as the mid 1940s. By 1948, Philip Hyde photographed barns and ranches for the first time in Plumas County. He also gave his only son a Pentax manual only film camera and taught him the basics of how to use it when David was just 10 years old. For decades the younger Hyde made no more than a few hundred images. However, after 2009 when he bought a Nikon digital camera, David Leland Hyde has made over 80,000 images, more than one third of which depict agricultural subjects. He produces archival prints in limited editions of only 100 from single capture master files. He uses Photoshop mainly for the same adjustments film photographers like his father used in the darkroom.

D. H. Day Barn From North, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Michigan, 2015 by David Leland Hyde. (Click on image to see large.)

“I strive to observe mundane scenes, everyday objects and simple beauty in an unusual and more present, mindful way,” Hyde said. “I look not just for light contrast, but psychological. I look for redemption in ruin, rebirth with decay, tolerance next to hate, yin within yang.” In 2015, he traveled over 10,000 miles around the US Heartland photographing for three months in a 1984 Ford van his dad converted when new from a cargo van to a specialized field photography camper. In the Midwest a reporter told him the state of Minnesota alone loses more than 300 barns a year. Meanwhile, in the West it has become common to use chutes to hold calves still for branding. However, David photographed local ranchers this year in Indian Valley who still do it the old way, roping and rustling the calves by hand.

Restoration has stabilized the base of the Olsen Barn in Chester, preventing potential collapse under heavy snow or wind. However, many old farm structures no longer get much use to justify the high costs of maintaining them. Hyde hopes his project can bring awareness and funding for historical restoration efforts. Additional shows of his agricultural work and a book are also in the works.

“We are excited to have a fund-raising exhibition here,” said Scott Lawson, Plumas County Museum Director. “It is noteworthy that David’s work will be displayed on the Mezzanine Gallery near his father’s 40×50 darkroom prints which have graced our walls since 1969.” David Leland Hyde plans to donate to the museum half of all proceeds from the sale of his fine art prints and other collectibles. Please enjoy the show and support the museum. The first 50 people to arrive at the opening will receive a keepsake gift.

Details:

Opening Reception: First Friday, September 7, 5 to 7 pm

Artist’s Talk: 6 pm, September 7

Exhibition: September 7 through December 29, 2018

Plumas County Museum
500 Jackson Street
Quincy, California
530-283-6320
pcmuseum [at] psln [dot] com

 

More Photographs From the Show:

Open Gate and Big Red Barn on Chandler Road near Quincy, California, 2013 by David Leland Hyde. (Click on image to see large.)

Amish Teenage Brothers and Horse Cart Near Holton, Michigan by David Leland Hyde (Click on image to see large.)

Cloudy Sunset, Olsen Barn, Lake Almanor Near Chester, California, Sierra, 2015 David Leland Hyde. This photograph has been actively used by Feather River Land Trust in the Olsen Barn Campaign. (Click on image to see large.)

Horse Barn, Tall Grass, Genesee Valley, Spring, Northern Sierra, California, 2017 by David Leland Hyde. (Click on image to see large.)

Ranch on North Side of Sierra Valley, Plumas County, California, 2017 by David Leland Hyde. (Click on image to see large.)

Horses on the Run, Central Wyoming, 2016 by David Leland Hyde. (Click on image to see large.)

Farm Workers, Strawberry Fields Near Oceano and Guadalupe, California, 2014 by David Leland Hyde. (Click on image to see large.)

Spanish Peak and Dyrr Barn, American Valley, Quincy, California, 2015 by David Leland Hyde. (Click on image to see large.)

Broken Gate Shadows, Willow, North Barn, Lemmon Canyon Ranch Near Sierraville, Sierra Valley, California, 2018 by David Leland Hyde. (Click on image to see large.)

Amish Horse & Buggy, Menno-Yoder ‘Brown Swiss Dairy’ 12-Sided Concrete Barn, Shipshewana, Indiana, 2015 by David Leland Hyde. (Click on image to see large.)

Keith Round Barn Under Tornado Skies, North Platte, Nebraska, Black and White, 2015 by David Leland Hyde. (Click on image to see large.)

Old Farm Machines, Outlaw Trail Ranch Near Escalante, Utah, 2014 by David Leland Hyde. (Click on image to see large.)

Fritz & Andy Roping, MH Branding, Openshaw Ranch, Mt. Hough, Indian Valley, California, 2018 by David Leland Hyde. (Click on image to see large.)