Posts Tagged ‘Alaska Range’

Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 22

February 9th, 2021

Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log: June 14-September 14, 1971 by Ardis Hyde

(Ardis, David and Philip Hyde in Their Camper. Continued from the blog post, “Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 21.”)

Part 22: Denali National Park, Alaska. Mt. Denali, Wonder Lake Campground. Cottage called “Permafrost.” (Formerly Mt. McKinley, Wonder Lake Campground.)

Mt. Denali From Wonder Lake, Alaska Range, Denali National Park, Alaska, 1971 by Philip Hyde. Digital image from high resolution Tango drum scan of the original Kodak large format 4X5 color transparency. Remastered by Carr Clifton. (Click to see large.)

Wednesday, July 21, 1971: Clear and sunny. Mt. Denali on full display. We woke up suddenly at 6:45 am when we realized the mountain was out. We rolled up the shades and there it was all snowy and white before us. We got going immediately out the road we came in on. Philip took some pictures and we all had breakfast. By 9:30 am we were at Camp Denali. We left the camper at the road and walked up to inquire about lodging and camping and to look around. Noted wildlife artist Bill Berry was there and we visited with him. We made arrangements with manager Wally Cole to stay two nights in their cottage, “Permafrost.”

Philip made some photographs at the “Nugget Pond.” We ate lunch in our camper, which Philip brought up the hill opposite our cabin next to the woodshed. After resting a while we walked out to a low ridge beyond the camp. Philip made 35 mm and 2 ¼ Hasselblad images of lichen and flowers. Much fewer flowers in the area at that time as the season had passed. The terrain on the hilltops was drier than what we have seen up until now. We came back to the cottage before dinner. Philip worked on arranging film in the camper. David played with his cars outside. I walked up to the lodge to look at books before dinner. There was a call for dinner and we all walked over to cottage, “Potlatch.”

The Franklin Stove glowed and the warmth felt good. The rain started before dinner. Philip and David had come up the hill in it. It tapered off during dinner. Over our meal, we got acquainted with Romany Wood, daughter of Ginny Wood, co-founder of the Alaska Conservation Society in 1960. We left right after dinner to put David to bed. We returned to the lodge to read and visit with guests for a while before going off to bed in “Permafrost.” David slept on the top bunk, Philip under him and I took the trundle cot. All very cozy.

Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 21

January 29th, 2015

Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log: June 14-September 14, 1971 by Ardis Hyde

(Ardis, David and Philip Hyde in Their Camper. Continued from the blog post, “Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 20.”)

Part 21: Traveling Inside Denali National Park, Alaska. (Formerly McKinley National Park.) Savage River Campground to Mt. Denali, Wonder Lake Campground (Mt. McKinley, Wonder Lake Campground.)

Mt. Brooks, Alaska Range near Mt. Denali, Denali National Park, Alaska, copyright Philip Hyde 1971. Previous digital image was a Creo flatbed scan of a 10x 12 dye transfer print. This image is from a newer higher quality drum scan just being optimized for print making.

Mt. Brooks, Wonder Lake, Alaska Range near Mt. Denali, Denali National Park, Alaska, copyright Philip Hyde 1971. Previous digital image was a Creo flatbed scan of a 10×12 dye transfer vintage print. The image above is from a newer higher quality Tango drum scan of the original Kodak 4×5 color transparency just now being optimized for digital print making.

(See the photograph large: “Mt. Brooks, Alaska Range, Denali National Park.”)

Tuesday, July 20, 1971: Rain. The sky was fully clouded over again this morning. We made it over to the service station by 7:45 a.m. It opened at 8:00 a.m. and immediately had a jam of gas customers. We got the tire fixed again by 9:30 a.m. They replaced the large boot, which had been applied twice unsuccessfully, with a smaller patch. Finally, we were on our way west toward Wonder Lake. At Mile 16, 10:35 a.m., we stopped to look at a bull moose willow grazing up slope too far away to photograph. At Mile 17 we saw a Ptarmigan. Philip got photos of two adults with their young. At Mile 18 we looked for foxes as reported to us by photographer Charlie Ott, whom we had met at the Post Office before we left Savage River. No foxes were at home. We reached Teklanitka in time for lunch beside the Teklanitka River in the same spot as we did before. After lunch, we ran into some excitement along Igloo Mountain, where Philip spotted some mountain Dall sheep. We stopped to look long at them, passing the binoculars between the three of us. They were in three groups, 13 sheep in total. We also saw another small group closer down on the far side of Igloo Creek. We stopped again about 4:00 p.m. on the climb up to Highway Pass. Philip made a Hasselblad 2 ¼ image looking back at Polychrome Pass with a foreground of dryas flowers, as on the hillside. The sky continued heavy with clouds and temperatures remained cool. We caught not a single glimpse of Mt. Denali all day. We reached Ellison Visitor Center after it closed at about 5:45 p.m. I cooked a cornbread and beans dinner while Philip photographed Sunset Glacier with the 4×5 view camera. Thorofare River was beautiful with Muldrow Glacier and lower colorful slopes of grey and gold rock and talus. I put David to bed before we left. Philip took a 2 ¼ picture of an interesting effect of light falling on Sunset Glacier behind a grey cloud curtain with a straight line bottom. Onward slowly we drove, while admiring the beautiful delicate colors of what was visible. Rain started and continued all the way to Wonder Lake. When we arrived, the campground was pretty well filled with campers. So, we parked with permission over near Wonder Lake, for which they charged us $2.00. It was still raining when we went to sleep.

(Continued in the next blog post in the series, “Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 22.”)

Has it ever rained for days on any of your travels? Were you able to photograph or do other activities?

Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 16

October 18th, 2011

Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log: June 14-September 14, 1971 by Ardis Hyde

(Ardis, David and Philip Hyde in Their Camper. Continued from the blog post, “Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 15.”)

Part Sixteen: The Alaska Highway, Mile 1337 to Fairbanks, Alaska

Fall Tundra Near Brushkana Creek, Denali Highway, Alaska Range In The Distance, Alaska, copyright 1976 Philip Hyde.

(See the photograph larger, “Fall Tundra Near Brushkana Creek, Denali Highway, Alaska Highway In Distance, Alaska.”)

Monday, July 12, 1971:  We awoke at 6:00 a.m. to rain showers, but the visibility improved and the sun even came out between showers. We spent the morning right at our camp while Philip photographed the swallows. We also did office chores, each took showers and I baked bread. We ate lunch also before leaving. The Alaska Range was clear of the clouds with sunshine on all the peaks. After leaving at 12:10 p.m., we made some picture stops for flowers with the 35 mm camera. We stopped at Mile 1377 for yellow poppies and wild aster. At Mile 1379 we stopped for Larkspur where a scenic turnout, several campers and two tour buses brought out a swarm of people. We also stopped at Johnson Road Bridge for Philip to make photographs upstream. Mile 1381 presented a roadside cut bank for a flower garden with poppies in white, yellow, coral, orange, pale and deep pinks. A stunning sight that Philip photographed in 35 mm and 4X5 view camera. Some wind, but not enough to spoil the picture show. I gathered seeds as plants had everything from flower buds to ripe and dry fruit pads on them. It grew cloudier now, almost solid overcast. At the Big Gerstle River Bridge, Mile 1392.8, we descended by gravel road out onto the gravel river bed for the view and a 4X5 photograph back at the Alaska Range, rising in height now and showing some glacier laden peaks. David played with the spread of stream pebbles. Philip was pleased with the photographs he made of the Alaska Range here. We stopped at Delta Junction for gas. We found an overlook of the Tanana River flats, but the mountains were cloud-veiled so we at dinner and waited. Philip exposed a 4X5 color transparency, but had to retreat before he could get a black and white negative because of rain. It was very humid. We have started seeing Arctic Larch trees. The Arctic Larch are about the same size as the Spruce here, but with lighter, feathery foliage. After dinner we continued North with David in bed. Soon we were coming into birch stands. It was wonderful to see a native forest of birch trees. We arrived at Harding Lake Campground and decided to spend the night as it was now raining harder. The fee was $2.00 for Harding Lake because it was a new state campground. We used the dumping facilities. Philip had to change the right front tire for the second time. It was one we had repaired in Juneau. The surroundings consisted of a mixed birch and spruce forest with a moss carpet. Douglas squirrels and snowshoe rabbits were common. It was a warm, though wet night, only getting down to 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

Tuesday, July 13, 1971:  We woke up at 6:00 a.m. to rain and left Harding Lake Campground about 8:30 am. We drove through the big campground and along Harding Lake, then out to the Alaska Highway. Intermittent houses and businesses appeared along the highway all the way into Fairbanks. The dirt Alaska Highway would soon be replaced by a freeway that was under construction from Eielson Air Force Base into Fairbanks. We stopped along the runway to watch a B-52 Jet Bomber taxi out to the runway. We waited but they didn’t take off. We headed on into Fairbanks by 10:00 a.m. Our first destination was a service station to get the tire fixed. I shopped next door at Traveland. Then we drove on to the parking area next to the China River Restaurant where we ate lunch. We crossed the Eagle River over a bridge to the Fairbanks Chamber of Commerce located in a sod roofed log house. Then we headed out to the College and the University of Alaska Museum, the Student Union, bookstore and so on. Drove over to Malcolm Lockwood’s home where we met Jean and her daughter Elisha. In the evening I went with Malcolm’s mother to look at Eskimo made objects. I bought a group for Christmas presents. Philip looked at prints of the University of Alaska’s Museum staff photographer Barry McWayne.

Wednesday, July 14, 1971:  We spent the overcast and partly rainy day mainly visiting with Malcolm Lockwood’s family. David and Elisha played very well together. Philip and Malcolm Lockwood were in conversations about photography or out on a short field trip in the afternoon to a birch grove with Barry McWayne. I wrote letters, baked cookies and baked bread. About dinnertime the sun began to come out, but most of the day had been grey with rain off and on.

Continued in the blog post, “Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 17.”