Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 22

February 9th, 2021 by David Leland Hyde Leave a reply »

Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log: June 14-September 14, 1971 by Ardis Hyde

(Ardis, David and Philip Hyde in Their Camper. Continued from the blog post, “Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 21.”)

Part 22: Denali National Park, Alaska. Mt. Denali, Wonder Lake Campground. Cottage called “Permafrost.” (Formerly Mt. McKinley, Wonder Lake Campground.)

Mt. Denali From Wonder Lake, Alaska Range, Denali National Park, Alaska, 1971 by Philip Hyde. Digital image from high resolution Tango drum scan of the original Kodak large format 4X5 color transparency. Remastered by Carr Clifton. (Click to see large.)

Wednesday, July 21, 1971: Clear and sunny. Mt. Denali on full display. We woke up suddenly at 6:45 am when we realized the mountain was out. We rolled up the shades and there it was all snowy and white before us. We got going immediately out the road we came in on. Philip took some pictures and we all had breakfast. By 9:30 am we were at Camp Denali. We left the camper at the road and walked up to inquire about lodging and camping and to look around. Noted wildlife artist Bill Berry was there and we visited with him. We made arrangements with manager Wally Cole to stay two nights in their cottage, “Permafrost.”

Philip made some photographs at the “Nugget Pond.” We ate lunch in our camper, which Philip brought up the hill opposite our cabin next to the woodshed. After resting a while we walked out to a low ridge beyond the camp. Philip made 35 mm and 2 ¼ Hasselblad images of lichen and flowers. Much fewer flowers in the area at that time as the season had passed. The terrain on the hilltops was drier than what we have seen up until now. We came back to the cottage before dinner. Philip worked on arranging film in the camper. David played with his cars outside. I walked up to the lodge to look at books before dinner. There was a call for dinner and we all walked over to cottage, “Potlatch.”

The Franklin Stove glowed and the warmth felt good. The rain started before dinner. Philip and David had come up the hill in it. It tapered off during dinner. Over our meal, we got acquainted with Romany Wood, daughter of Ginny Wood, co-founder of the Alaska Conservation Society in 1960. We left right after dinner to put David to bed. We returned to the lodge to read and visit with guests for a while before going off to bed in “Permafrost.” David slept on the top bunk, Philip under him and I took the trundle cot. All very cozy.

(Continued in the next blog post in the series, “Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 23.”)

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