Posts Tagged ‘mountains’

Happy 4th of July: Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Family Camp

July 4th, 2016

Family Camp Weekend at Watson’s Walking “G”

People Photographs: Memories of Independence Day, July 4

In the United States of America, we celebrate Independence Day in the heat of summer. The heat causes thirst, which is quenched with alcoholic beverages more often than not. July 4 is the “fun” holiday. For a quality American 4th of July, also mix in hours and days of sunbathing slathered in tanning oil at the old swimming hole, complete with cool mountain stream swims.

Yet, when you are with old friends, the perfect holiday is not as much about the beach, sun or water as the conversations. This blog post is more personal than usual, but this is not the first time I have made such a post, especially on a major holiday. Different from what I typically write for this blog, it is an indication of one aspect of blog posts to come in the future.

Near the home where I grew up and now live again, at places like Indian Falls or Spanish Falls, giant rocks tower above deep river pools and make for good jumps, somersaults, dives, flips, gainers and belly-flops into Indian Creek or Spanish Creek. Here in Plumas County, we prepare for a 4th of July trip to our woodland beaches and creeks by getting overheated at the High Sierra Music Festival in Quincy, or at the 4th of July Parade and Taylorsville Silver Buckle Rodeo.

On other days around July 4th, for fun we go fishing, camp out in a tent or under the stars, eat rainbow trout for dinner, or crayfish, BBQ steak, chicken, baby back ribs, roasted bell peppers, BBQ Corn in the husk, salads, dips, chips, watermelon, sandwiches or pizza. Later after badminton, basketball, gin – rummy and gin – tonic, hearts, dingbat, zip line, horseshoes, bicycles, steal the sticks and rarely showers, we drive three miles to the Grange Hall, which has a bouncing wood dance floor. We dance like Mick Jagger at the cowboy two-step dance. Still later we venture out on a moonlit four wheel drive tour of Grizzly Ridge or Mount Hough. Anything for pure craziness with hilarity while following our bliss.

Most of the fun in Taylorsville happens at a private Family Camp next door to my house that carries on all hours of the day and night. The Watson’s Walking “G” Camp for over 40 years was a boys and girls recreational Summer Camp, but in the first 16 years after the official camp ended, the more informal Family Camp took over for one long weekend a year. The last time, Family Camp included around 140 guests tent camping and celebrating the 4th of July. Of the 140 people involved, about 95 were children. Family Camp at times has resembled either an amusement park, a quiet resort, a riot, or all three, depending on the moment. The following photographs may begin to portray some of what can happen…

…At Summer Camp when people let go of having a dream and step into dreamtime…

Many thanks to Robert and Brenda Watson for their hospitality, love and care for all at Summer Family Camp. Thanks also to all those who allowed me to make their photograph. I’ve progressed significantly since 2009 and appreciate having the opportunities to develop.

Apitizers, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Camp, Summer Family Camp, Plumas County, Northern Sierra Nevada, 2009 by David Leland Hyde.

Appetizers, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Camp, Summer Family Camp, Plumas County, Northern Sierra Nevada, 2009 by David Leland Hyde. (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Historical Practice of Tent Camping, Watson's Walking "G" Camp, Summer Family Camp by David Leland Hyde.

Historical Practice of Tent Camping, Watson’s Walking “G” Camp, Summer Family Camp, July 4 by David Leland Hyde Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is It Morning Already? Family Camp, July 4, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde.

Is It Morning Already? Family Camp, July 4, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde. (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Customary Walking and Smiling at Walking "G" Camp on July 4th, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde.

Customary Walking and Smiling at Walking “G” Camp on July 4th, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde. (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Badminton Bliss, Family Camp, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde.

Badminton Bliss, Family Camp, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde. (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Young Uncle Sam, Family Camp, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde.

Young Uncle Sam, Family Camp, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde. (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professional Crayfish Hunters, Family Camp, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde. (Click on Image to See Larger.)

Salty Crayfish Hunters, Family Camp, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde. (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Welles and Brando, Family Camp, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde.

Welles and Brando, Family Camp, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wrecking Uncle Sam With A Ping Pong Ball, July 4, Family Camp, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde. (To See Larger Click on Image.)

Wrecking Uncle Sam With A Ping Pong Ball, July 4, Family Camp, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde. (To See Larger Click on Image.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Burford's Swimming Hole, July 4, Family Camp, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde. (To See Larger Click on Image.)

Burford’s Swimming Hole, July 4, Family Camp, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde. (To See Larger Click on Image.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beach Hangout, Burford's Swimming Hole, July 4, Family Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde. (To See Larger Click on Image.)

Beach Hangout, Burford’s Swimming Hole, July 4, Family Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde. (To See Larger Click on Image.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Young Boy Still Fishing After Suddenly Outgrowing Vest, July 4, Family Camp, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde. (To See Larger Click on Image.)

Young Boy Still Fishing After Suddenly Outgrowing Vest, July 4, Family Camp, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde. (To See Larger Click on Image.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tough Women of the Woods, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

Tough Women of the Woods, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cowboy Taking Break From Tavern Indian Wars, July 4, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

Cowboy Taking Break From Tavern Indian Wars, July 4, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wandering Australian Cowboy From The Outback, Family Camp, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

Wandering Australian Cowboy From The Outback, Family Camp, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maestro of the Bistro, Family Camp, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

Maestro of the Bistro, Family Camp, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mom's Hands Shrivel After Peeling 1000 Ears of Corn, Family Camp, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

Mom’s Hands Shrivel After Shucking 1000 Ears of Corn, but luckily her sister can peel at least 2000, Family Camp, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parade Clowns Planning to Smuggle Margaritas Into Mexico, Family Camp, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

Parade Clowns Planning to Smuggle Margaritas Into Mexico, Family Camp, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tattooed Biker, Family Camp, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

Tattooed Biker, Family Camp, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Family Camp Crazy Chaos Before Dinner, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

Family Camp Crazy Chaos Before Dinner, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pitchfork Carrying Carnivorous Chef and Wicked Meat Feast, Family Camp, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

Pitchfork Carrying Chef and Santa Maria Style BBQ Feast, Family Camp, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bar-B-Que Awe, Family Camp, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

Bar-B-Que Awe, Family Camp, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chair Photo Sobriety Test, Family Camp, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

Chair Photo Sobriety Test, Family Camp, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Family Camp Laughter and Friendship, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

Family Camp Laughter and Friendship, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 4 Dinner Was So Late We Thought It Was Breakfast, Family Camp, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

July 4 Dinner Was So Late We Thought It Was Breakfast, Family Camp, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Only Moment of Quiet Reflection, Family Camp, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

The Only Moment of Quiet Reflection, Family Camp, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spreading Rumors and Gossip, Family Camp, July 4, Watson's Walking "G" Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

Spreading Rumors and Gossip, Family Camp, July 4, Watson’s Walking “G” Summer Camp, Northern Sierra, California by David Leland Hyde (Click on Image to See Larger.)

Ed Cooper: Mountaineer, Rock Climber And Large Format Photographer

January 22nd, 2015

Rock Climber And Mountaineer Ed Cooper Packed A Large Format Camera To The Top Of Many Of North America’s Highest Peaks

Now He Speaks Out About His Explorations, First Ascents, Sierra Club Books, Conservation And Philip Hyde’s Contribution

Short Bio of Ed Cooper

Ed Cooper, author and photographer, working with a newly acquired 5x7 Gundlach Bundschu view camera, top of Mt. Reynolds, Glacier National Park, Washington, copyright Ed Cooper Collection 1964.

Ed Cooper, author and photographer, working with a newly acquired 5×7 Gundlach Bundschu view camera, top of Mt. Reynolds, Glacier National Park, Washington, copyright Ed Cooper Collection 1964. Cooper nearly always carried all of his own medium and large camera equipment to the tops of many of North America’s highest peaks. The only exception Cooper could remember was once on a pack trip into the Ramparts where grizzly bears were plentiful and a horse carried his view cameras.

Ed Cooper is a pioneer mountaineer and fine art photographer who lives in the California wine country. At age 16, he climbed Mt. Rainier, 14,411′ (4392 meters), one of Washington’s most formidable peaks and photographed the experience. He has climbed and photographed mountains ever since, nearly always with a large format camera. His collection of summits includes Mt. Denali, Denali National Park, Alaska (20,320) the highest peak in North America and the 3,000 foot vertical face of El Capitan in Yosemite Valley, Yosemite National Park.

In December 2003, the film, In the Shadow of the Chief: The Baldwin and Cooper Story came out telling the tale of Ed Cooper and Jim Baldwin’s unusual scaling of the Grand Wall of the Stawamus Chief near Squamish, British Columbia, Canada in 1961. The climb was sponsored by the town and the film features vintage footage of the original ascent, as well as new footage of a re-enactment.

Clouds wreathe Mt. Robson, 12,972', 3954m, highest peak in the Canadian Rockies in Mt. Robson Provincial Park. Original is an 8x10 black and white negative using Tr-X film and a red filter, taken 8-18-1968 about 10 am. An 8x10 Eastman view camera and a 36" Dallmeyer lens, weighing over 10 pounds, were used in a set-up requiring two tripods. Some burning and dodging was required to bring this print to completion. Copyright Ed Cooper, British Columbia.

Clouds wreathe Mt. Robson, 12,972′, 3954m, highest peak in the Canadian Rockies in Mt. Robson Provincial Park. Original is an 8×10 black and white negative using Tr-X film and a red filter, taken 8-18-1968 about 10 am. An 8×10 Eastman view camera and a 36″ Dallmeyer lens, weighing over 10 pounds, were used in a set-up requiring two tripods. Some burning and dodging was required to bring this print to completion. Copyright Ed Cooper, British Columbia.

His new book, Soul of Yosemite: Portraits Of Light And Stone (2011) consists of a selection, from his collection of Yosemite images dating back to 1962, which best represents the area and fits into the organization of the book entering Yosemite National Park from El Portal, progressing through Yosemite Valley on Southside Drive and on to Tuolumne Meadows, including a short section on the Hetch-Hetchy area, now a reservoir, once a valley flooded in 1914. It also includes a short section on the author climbing a new route on El Capitan in 1962.

His previous book, Soul of the Heights: 50 Years Going to the Mountains (2007) offers glimpses into mountaineering and rock climbing in the 1950s and early 1960s during the highly competitive era of first ascents, through his own experiences, photographs and exclusive firsthand accounts by climbers of the era about their first ascents of now top destination climbs. Ed Cooper’s 4×5 and 5×7 photographs include portraits of many of the best-known peaks in North America. His earlier books are Soul of the Rockies: Portraits of America’s Largest Mountain Range, The American Wilderness in the Words of John Muir, Grand Canyon: Shrine of the Ages and Early Mining Days – California Gold Country: The Story Behind the Scenery. Ed Cooper’s photographs graced the famous Sierra Club Desk Calendars for many years, as well as many other prominent publications including many of the Sierra Club Exhibit Format Series books and other Sierra Club Books and publications.

Climbing Mountains, Photographing For Sierra Club Books, Glen Canyon And Conservation

By Ed Cooper, March 2012

Date: Sometime in late 1956 or early 1957

Place: Washington State

Climber on cornice at about the 12,000' (3650m) altitude on Mt. Robson. Mt. Resplendent, 11,240' (3426m) is in the left background. Copyright Ed Cooper Photo 1961. British Columbia.

Climber on cornice at about the 12,000′ (3650m) altitude on Mt. Robson. Mt. Resplendent, 11,240′ (3426m) is in the left background. Copyright Ed Cooper Photo 1961. British Columbia.

Back then I was about 20 years old, busying myself with climbing the volcanoes and other peaks in the Pacific Northwest. These activities were carried on when I was not occupied with my studies at the University of Washington, or perhaps I should say, I went climbing when I should have been occupied with my studies. I had aspirations to visit other mountain areas also, such as the Sierra Nevada. One day I walked into a bookstore and spotted the following book: The Climber’s Guide to the High Sierrawritten by Hervey Voge and published by the Sierra Club. Immediately I purchased the book from the meager funds I had available at that time.

At the first opportunity, I sat down to look through the book and began to plan climbing objectives in the Sierra Nevada for the time when my financial situation would allow me to go there. At the front of the book were 17 black and white photographs. Six of the photos were by Ansel Adams, whose name I had heard only recently at that time. However, as I looked at all the images, my gaze quickly settled on one that was my favorite–the   now iconic black and white photograph of Lake Ediza and the Minarets with the rock slabs on the left side of the picture. All the elements fall into place perfectly. It turned out that the photographer was Philip Hyde. Years later I heard that Ansel Adams had remarked that he liked Philip Hyde’s rendition of the Minarets better than his own.

It was to be a number of years before I made it to the Sierra Nevada, but it was not nearly so long before I learned more about Philip Hyde and his outstanding contribution–through his photography–to the conservation movement.

I remember looking with fascination at This is Dinosaur: Echo Park Country and Its Magic Rivers(1955) with an introduction and chapter by Pulitzer Prize winner Wallace Stegner and photographs by Philip Hyde and Martin Litton. Somewhat later I pored over Island in Time: The Point Reyes Peninsula(1962) by Harold Gilliam and Philip Hyde. Philip’s books were all aimed at protecting diverse wilderness areas in the Western US. He provided more photography for the Sierra Club Exhibit Format Series than did any other photographer.

Igloo Camp at about 13,500' (4115m) at Windy Corner on Mt. Denali (was Mt. McKinley) 20,320' (6194m) June, 1958. Climber Fergus O'Connor is on the right. Copyright Ed Cooper Photo. Alaska.

Igloo Camp at about 13,500′ (4115m) at Windy Corner on Mt. Denali (was Mt. McKinley) 20,320′ (6194m) June, 1958. Climber Fergus O’Connor is on the right. Copyright Ed Cooper Photo. Denali National Park, Alaska.

In these years my climbs became increasingly difficult, but I found that I had a penchant for photography myself, progressing from an Ansco Panda box camera, to two 2 ¼ square folding cameras, and finally to my first 4×5 camera—a Speed Graphic in 1962. Later I progressed to actual view cameras, 4×5, 5×7 and 8×10. I found myself becoming more interested in capturing images on film than reaching summits or climbing large cliff faces.

I made what might be considered a pilgrimage about 1969 to meet Philip in his home in the northern Sierra Nevada. He was gracious; there was no air of pretentiousness about him. He wowed me by showing me his studio work area and many samples of his darkroom prints.

The Exhibit Format Series packed a powerful punch. How powerful it was I did not realize until February of 2012, when I received a letter from Bill Douglas in Annapolis, Maryland. I had done photography for The Alpine Lakes, a de facto wilderness area in the Cascade Mountains not far from Seattle. This book was published in a large format edition, similar to the Sierra Club Books, by the Seattle Mountaineers in 1971. The pressure by the mining, logging, and other interests to exploit this area was intense.

Bill described how President Ford had been persuaded to sign the bill to protect the Alpine Lakes Wilderness Area. Washington’s then Governor Dan Evans had flown to Washington for an appointment with President Ford to try to persuade him to sign the bill, but had forgotten to take a copy of The Alpine Lakes book with him. Bill Douglas and Dan Evans were hiking buddies who had talked about the importance of this meeting. Bill ended up taking his own copy of the book to the White House, where Dan showed the book to President Ford. Words were not needed. Ford exclaimed something like “This is beautiful country – it’s gotta be protected,” and signed the bill. Bill still has that book with the inscription “To Bill Douglas, with warmest best wishes, Gerald R. Ford.” That is the power of conservation photography.

Photographer Ed Cooper with special telephoto set-up for large format. An 8x10 Eastman Kodak view camera was attached to a 36" Dallmeyer lens (former aerial spy lens). Two tripods were required to support this set-up. Ed Cooper installed a Packard shutter triggered by a red bulb. September 1970 in the White Mountains looking towards the Sierra Nevada. Copyright Debby Cooper Photo. California.

Photographer Ed Cooper with special telephoto set-up for large format. An 8×10 Eastman Kodak view camera was attached to a 36″ Dallmeyer lens (former aerial spy lens). Two tripods were required to support this set-up. Ed Cooper installed a Packard shutter triggered by a red bulb. September 1970 in the White Mountains looking towards the Sierra Nevada. Copyright Debby Cooper Photo. California.

While Philip’s books resulted in the protection of many wild areas, conservationists will always remember with regret the place that got away. I refer to Glen Canyon, flooded when Glen Canyon Dam was built to create what is now Lake Powell in Utah and Arizona. I am sure Philip felt this regret acutely, as he had spent time capturing one-of-a-kind images of this now flooded national treasure. On a visit there just recently in 2011, I saw large areas of ugly mud flats left behind by receding Lake Powell with the reservoir level at that time down more than 100 feet.

Philip Hyde said: “For every place there will always be people that want to exploit it, and there will always be people—hopefully—that want to save it and keep it as it is. Even with the risk of inviting crowds into Paradise, better to publish your photographs and rally the troops. What’s in the frame of the photograph matters artistically, to be sure, but what’s outside the frame can destroy it.” Truer words were never spoken.

We are fortunate to have David Leland Hyde, Philip’s son, continuing to bring his father’s legacy to us in digital restorations of many of Philip’s images that were crucially important to the conservation movement, as well as the stories behind them. Both the stories and images might otherwise be lost.