Posts Tagged ‘limited edition’

David Leland Hyde Archival Prints Pre-Launch

September 29th, 2011

David Leland Hyde’s Archival Lightjet Digital Prints

Pre-Launch of Limited Edition Archival Digital Prints

(REGULAR BLOG POSTS BEGIN BELOW THIS ANNOUNCEMENT.)

7X.-DHCA-BSur-39-09-River-Mouth,-Beach,-Big-Sur.sharp-For-Web-blog

Beach At Little Sur River Mouth Near Pacific Coast Highway 1, Ice Plant, Fog, Pacific Ocean, California Beaches, copyright 2009 David Leland Hyde.

(See the photograph larger, go to “River Mouth, Beach, Big Sur, California.”)

Now in an unusual and unprecedented pre-launch time frame, we are offering fine art archival Lightjet digital prints of my photographs. This group of images is the first version of my first portfolio offered in a Limited Edition of only 100 archival digital prints of each photograph. While I am full-time in the business of photography representing my father pioneer landscape photographer Philip Hyde’s work, I am only a part-time photographer. My photographs and archival digital prints will continue to be rare. There will be only 100 prints offered in all sizes of each image as long as I live. In the future my photographs will be advertised, covered and offered in major media, but will be available now only by word of mouth and online during the pre-launch.

David Leland Hyde’s Artist Statement

My purpose is to hurl down icons and smash conventions while expressing who I am through street, still life, architectural and landscape photography. I seek equalization and spiritual freedom with a laughing irreverence for ideologies perpetuated out of fear. I aspire to portray all races, cultures and life as I find them, yet with a twist added through my own selection of the elements within the frame. I often strive for irony, symbolism or to send a message to the viewer through the photographic image that will help people awaken from the present mass slumber party.

A Note On the Photographs

These photographs are all single exposures made with a Nikon D90, often hand held, some with minimal post-processing, some are camera raw. For the most part, I do not pre-plan photographs, or even often take special outings for the purpose of photographing, but make my images in the course of my travels and activities. Thus these were nearly all what would be called “found” photographs, though in the case of those occurring around where live, I sometimes made the photograph on a different day from when I first saw the opportunity.

David Leland Hyde Archival Print Pricing

Print Size      Unmatted/Unframed           Matted         Matted & Framed

8X12                    $55                                $75                         $95

16X24                  175                                245                         315

20X30                  385                                475                         565

For Print Acquisitions Please Contact:

David Leland Hyde

303-562-8198 cell

david@philiphyde.com

http://www.philiphyde.com/

Or order the archival digital prints from inside the Portfolios tab on the Philip Hyde Photography website. Go into the David Leland Hyde Portfolio and scroll down below each photograph to read image information, sizes and pricing information.

To see David Leland Hyde’s best photographs from 2011 see the blog post, “Best Photos Of 2011,” or to view the best of 2012 see the blog post, “My 12 Greatest Hits of 2012.” To read an interview by landscape photographer and blogger Guy Tal go to, “Interview With David Leland Hyde.” To see David Leland Hyde’s photographs of winter in the desert see the blog post, “Winter Snow On Desert Landscaspes.” Or for his images of San Francisco see the blog post, “The Flowers Of San Francisco.” To view David Leland Hyde’s photographs of the ghost town Bodie, Mono Lake and the Sierra Nevada East Side see “Sierra Eastside Adventures: Bishop, Mono Lake and Bodie.” To see another high quality interview by photographer Richard Wong see, “Son Of An Environmental Photography Pioneer.”

Economic Immunity And Freedom 1: Trash Your Television

August 22nd, 2011

Grasses, Clouds Reflected, Tuolumne Meadows, Yosemite National Park, copyright 2009 by David Leland Hyde. Nikon D90. This photograph and a select group of others will be available soon as limited edition archival fine art digital prints. A friend, who already acquired a 16X20 print of this photograph, said it helps remind her clients of tranquility.

Something fascinating happened to me over the last few months. I have not listened to the Radio or watched TV. This has created a strange, yet significantly measurable positive effect. I know, I know, it is best to stay informed, to be aware of what is going on. Or is it? Is the news a good representative cross-section of events in the world, or does it have a sensationalized negative slant? Could you miss something critical by Trashing Your Television? Probably not. I have discovered that the most significant events seem to get relayed to me by people I run across during the day anyway.

I tuned into NPR for the first time in many months around the beginning of August, just in time to hear about a week-long plummet of European stock markets. Just as I did in October 2008, I sat down in shock and fear. Then I gathered myself out of a knee-jerk response and opened my heart as big as I could and first said yes to the fear, then let it gradually leave and dissipate.

Ever since I have been keeping Radio Silence and Trashing Television. I find that I have a much more positive outlook than many others I talk to, and guess what? Remaining News Media Free isn’t just a Pollyanna perspective either. It produces a measurable difference in the world. Staying positive has produced positive results. I have sold six prints this week including one of Dad’s vintage black and white prints. I also developed a pending situation that will bring as many as 20 more print sales in the near future.

Remember that what began all of this was the bank policy of giving loans to under qualified people. Where does bank policy come from? There is no conspiracy, just follow the money. Look to who is making policy. The Great Depression in the 1920s was the largest transfer of wealth in history away from the middle and lower classes to the richest corporate shareholders. A whole new brand of transfer is on again now.

There is another reason the economy has to take a dive this century. And I do mean a whole century long “managed collapse.” Get used to it. The maximum number of clean energy sources available can provide only about 30 percent of the energy on which the current oil based economy runs. To make the transition to a clean energy society, we have to operate the world economy on 30 percent of the energy we do now. That means we have to trim 70 percent of the fat.

Through it all, Photography will survive.

Will you survive in photography?

Will your photography survive?

Some photographers will thrive and some will fail.

Will you thrive?

Images Of The Southwest Portfolio Foreword By Philip Hyde

April 26th, 2010

Plateau Edge, Southern Utah, 1974 by Philip Hyde. One of 12 photographs printed as dye transfer prints in the “Images of The Southwest” portfolio. “Images of the Southwest” was intended as a limited edition of 50, which in itself was a collosal undertaking. Making 50 X 12 = 600 dye transfer prints by hand was no easy task. However, at some point there was trouble with the distributor. Philip Hyde took the sale of the portfolio back over after 31 sold and no more portfolios were distributed or made thereafter.

Images of the Southwest: Foreword by Philip Hyde

The Southwest is a very special place for me. Over the many years of travel and photography in the region, there has been a certain evolution in my work from communication of a sense of place, to a search for the essences that express the whole region’s uniqueness.

My method of working has long been a kind of passing through the country, hoping to make discoveries. I want to let the country speak to me without my imposing preconceptions on it. A slow pace is important in this. And, since I can be only a temporary visitor, walking and camping for a month or a season, I must keep going back. I can’t get enough of that warm color, sense enough of the remote wilderness that still lingers in places.

Here the Planet’s basic structure has been laid bare, as if to serve better the consummate artistry of erosion’s creative force, that is even now enlarging its catalog of supreme works.

At the extremes of the year in Summer or Winter, the country may retreat behind a screen of seeming hostility, as with the heat haze of Summer noons, or the bone-chilling cold of blizzard winds that hurl sparse snowflakes across the unbroken spaces. But even then, the country invites you to come again, in Spring or Fall when these ephemeral seasons supply the brightest accents of nature’s scene. This elusive quality is underlined by an increasing awareness that the land’s vulnerable beauty is fading under the onslaught of development.

Emerson wrote: “A nobler want of man is served by nature, namely the love of beauty…. But beauty in nature is not ultimate. It is the herald of inward and eternal beauty.”

Will the “inward and eternal beauty” thus heralded develop in men soon enough to preserve its well-springs? The question evokes a feeling of urgency in what was once called “the land of room enough and time enough.”

SEE ALSO THE BLOG POST, “The Legend of Dye Transfer Printing, Interrupted 1.”