NANPA Philip Hyde Grant 2010

January 27th, 2010 by David Leland Hyde Leave a reply »

NANPA Foundation Announces 2010 Recipient of the Philip Hyde Grant

Award Highlights Use of Photography in Conservation

Bald-faced hornet, Vespula maculata, emerging from nest, Ontario, by Paul Colangelo. (Finalist in the BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.)

Wheat Ridge, Colorado – The NANPA Foundation has announced that Paul Colangelo of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada is the recipient of the 2010 Philip Hyde Grant for his work in British Columbia. This $5,000 peer-reviewed grant is awarded annually to an individual member of the North American Nature Photography Association who is actively pursuing completion of an environmental project.

Sacred Headwaters, Sacred Journey is a documentary project of the Sacred Headwaters. Wildlife and nature photographer Paul Colangelo and writer Amanda Follett plan to raise awareness of this remote land and the issues surrounding it. See www.paulcolangelo.com and http://www.sacredheadwatersjourney.com/ for more information about Paul and the project in the northern reaches of North America.

Forest fire remains, Kootenay National Park, British Columbia, Canada, by Paul Colangelo. (In the group exhibit at the Smithsonian.)

Paul Colangelo specializes in editorial assignments and conservation efforts. His work has been exhibited at the Smithsonian Institute, was awarded an honorable mention in the International Photography Awards, and named a finalist in BBC’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year. Paul Colangelo lives in Vancouver, British Columbia.

In northern British Columbia, three of the province’s greatest salmon-bearing rivers (the Skeena, the Stikine and the Nass) are formed in the subalpine basin known as the Sacred Headwaters. The land has one of the largest intact predator-prey systems in North America, earning it the nickname, “Serengeti of the North,” and is the traditional territory of the Tahltan First Nation. It also is the location of natural resources such as coal and coal-bed methane and gold.

Headwaters of the Skeena River, Sacred Headwaters, British Columbia, by Paul Colangelo. (From the Sacred Headwaters, Sacred Journey project.)

The Sacred Headwaters are at the center of a dispute between the Tahltan First Nation, resource development industries, government and environmental groups. Competing interests concerning land use, mining and hunting have created divides and put the future health of the Sacred Headwaters at risk.

The NANPA Foundation develops, supports and implements nature photography projects jointly with the North American Nature Photography Association and other organizations. It initiates, partners, operates and generates funding for projects that advance awareness of and appreciation for nature through photography. For information about the NANPA Foundation, visit its website at www.nanpafoundation.org. For information about NANPA and the Annual Summit, visit www.nanpa.org.

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5 comments

  1. Hi David,
    Thank you again for including info on this on your blog and adding the sites to your blog roll. I have been spreading the word about your blog and will continue to do so. I think what you are doing is fantastic. As a photographer just starting out my career, I think it’s important to know about the pioneers and history of the field. So, thank you!
    Best regards,
    Paul

  2. Hi Paul, Thank you. I’m glad you feel that way. I feel the same way about what you are doing. I just wrote to a previous Philip Hyde Grant recipient and told her that I know my dad would be flattered by the caliber of photographers who receive an award in his name. I think it is extremely important for young photographers and the fine art people to see that photography for conservation is not just continuing, but growing in scope and stature, and that Dad helped to pave the way for it. My goal is to inspire the younger generation and educate the art establishment. Photographers in North America and around the world who care about the planet, ought to get more recognized, rewarded and encouraged to in turn expand public awareness. It is great to see that in your case, Paul, you are getting well-recognized based on the quality of your work. More power to you.

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