Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 21

January 29th, 2015 by David Leland Hyde Leave a reply »

Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log: June 14-September 14, 1971 by Ardis Hyde

(Ardis, David and Philip Hyde in Their Camper. Continued from the blog post, “Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 20.”)

Part 21: Traveling Inside Denali National Park, Alaska. (Formerly McKinley National Park.) Savage River Campground to Mt. Denali, Wonder Lake Campground (Mt. McKinley, Wonder Lake Campground.)

Mt. Brooks, Alaska Range near Mt. Denali, Denali National Park, Alaska, copyright Philip Hyde 1971. Previous digital image was a Creo flatbed scan of a 10x 12 dye transfer print. This image is from a newer higher quality drum scan just being optimized for print making.

Mt. Brooks, Wonder Lake, Alaska Range near Mt. Denali, Denali National Park, Alaska, copyright Philip Hyde 1971. Previous digital image was a Creo flatbed scan of a 10×12 dye transfer vintage print. The image above is from a newer higher quality Tango drum scan of the original Kodak 4×5 color transparency just now being optimized for digital print making.

(See the photograph large: “Mt. Brooks, Alaska Range, Denali National Park.”)

Tuesday, July 20, 1971: Rain. The sky was fully clouded over again this morning. We made it over to the service station by 7:45 a.m. It opened at 8:00 a.m. and immediately had a jam of gas customers. We got the tire fixed again by 9:30 a.m. They replaced the large boot, which had been applied twice unsuccessfully, with a smaller patch. Finally, we were on our way west toward Wonder Lake. At Mile 16, 10:35 a.m., we stopped to look at a bull moose willow grazing up slope too far away to photograph. At Mile 17 we saw a Ptarmigan. Philip got photos of two adults with their young. At Mile 18 we looked for foxes as reported to us by photographer Charlie Ott, whom we had met at the Post Office before we left Savage River. No foxes were at home. We reached Teklanitka in time for lunch beside the Teklanitka River in the same spot as we did before. After lunch, we ran into some excitement along Igloo Mountain, where Philip spotted some mountain Dall sheep. We stopped to look long at them, passing the binoculars between the three of us. They were in three groups, 13 sheep in total. We also saw another small group closer down on the far side of Igloo Creek. We stopped again about 4:00 p.m. on the climb up to Highway Pass. Philip made a Hasselblad 2 ¼ image looking back at Polychrome Pass with a foreground of dryas flowers, as on the hillside. The sky continued heavy with clouds and temperatures remained cool. We caught not a single glimpse of Mt. Denali all day. We reached Ellison Visitor Center after it closed at about 5:45 p.m. I cooked a cornbread and beans dinner while Philip photographed Sunset Glacier with the 4×5 view camera. Thorofare River was beautiful with Muldrow Glacier and lower colorful slopes of grey and gold rock and talus. I put David to bed before we left. Philip took a 2 ¼ picture of an interesting effect of light falling on Sunset Glacier behind a grey cloud curtain with a straight line bottom. Onward slowly we drove, while admiring the beautiful delicate colors of what was visible. Rain started and continued all the way to Wonder Lake. When we arrived, the campground was pretty well filled with campers. So, we parked with permission over near Wonder Lake, for which they charged us $2.00. It was still raining when we went to sleep.

(Continued in the next blog post in the series, “Denali National Park, Alaska Travel Log 22.”)

Has it ever rained for days on any of your travels? Were you able to photograph or do other activities?

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