Archive for ‘Collectors’ Info’ category

Plumas County Museum: First Venue for Agriculture West and Midwest

January 24th, 2019

The Plumas County Museum: Exhibiting Talented Artists and Serving Plumas County for 60 Years

David Leland Hyde’s First Museum Show, “Agriculture West and Midwest: Visual Stories of a Fading Traditional Way of Life From 17 States,” Raised Thousands of Dollars for the Plumas County Museum Association. The Museum Staff Chose Hyde’s Large 2017 Fine Art Print, “Horse Barn, Tall Grass, Genesee Valley Ranch” for Their Permanent Collection.

Horse Barn, Tall Grass, Genesee Valley Ranch, Spring, Northern Sierra, California, 2017 by David Leland Hyde. Part of the Agriculture West and Midwest Museum Show and the Plumas County Museum permanent collection. (Click to See Image Large.)

This feature blog post I originally intended for the purpose of promoting my art exhibition at the Plumas County Museum of over 110 archival photographic prints, all of which I printed and over 60 of which I personally matted and framed. However, I am now posting this as a thank you to the museum and it’s staff for all of their hard work and support of my project and to promote them going forward independent of my show as it moves on to new venues.

Some people believe museums are unnecessary. Many shun art museums in particular. Our current Oval Office Occupier abolished public support for the arts not realizing that his most successful business towers owe much prestige and high value to the neighborhood, the home of Manhattan’s premier museums. The National Endowment for the Arts website materials in 2017 stated that less than 10 percent of Americans have ever set foot in an art gallery or art museum. Why? Is it partly because schools teach the appreciation of art less and less? Are people turned off by perceived snobbery?

Is it because we are not taught in school that art adds to:

  • Community Culture
  • Business Profits
  • Neighborhood Property Values

The art of nature specifically:

  • Decreases Stress and Anxiety
  • Increases Mental Clarity
  • Improves Productivity
  • Improves Overall Health
  • Lowers Blood Pressure
  • Lowers Risk of Cancer

Museums are important institutions in any location, but a county museum that assists and supports other area museums and preserves and catalogs the artifacts, memoirs, court records, events, history, knowledge and whatever else mattered to the people and way of life in a county is an indispensable storehouse of treasures kept in trust for all of us to enjoy and help perpetuate.

The Plumas County Museum began as an idea instigated by restaurateur Bob Moon and bankers William Skaggs and Ward Ingersoll on behalf of Stella Fay Miller, a descendant from Plumas County pioneers who left a bequest that arranged for the purchase of the land and the construction of a museum. These three community leaders gathered together a Plumas County Museum Committee that later became the Board of Trustees for the museum. Philip Hyde, a Trustee and committee member hired the architect for the museum building, Osborne and Stewart from San Francisco. Both Hyde and Ansel Adams had done architectural photography for the related prestigious firms Spencer and Lee, and Stewart, Osborne and Lee. Bill Barlow submitted the lowest bid and became the contractor for the project in early 1968, completing the building in just over a year for a dedication ceremony on June 7, 1969.

Philip Hyde donated giant 32×40 and 40×50 darkroom black and white silver prints to the museum to hang around the inside of the Mezzanine. These silver prints were part of a series called, “The Four Seasons in Plumas County.” Dad wrote about the series that the photographs “Were selected not so much to show specific places in the county, as to represent in a more general way the landscape of the county—the setting of which has changed in details, but has remained overall impression substantially as it was when the first pioneers found their way into the mountains and valleys of the upper Feather River country. These large photographs are still on view today and can be seen from either upstairs or downstairs.

Throughout the 1970s, the museum sold Philip Hyde prints. Dad’s well-known photograph “Spanish Creek,” of which original Dye Transfer prints today sell for $6,000 to 8,000 and more, in 1970 were priced at $22.50 at the Plumas County Museum. Bob Moon wrote a letter to Dad in July 1970 explaining that sales had been brisker than expected and that the prints needed to be restocked. Incidentally, Bob Moon also helped Dad get on TV for the first time during the early days of the museum. The Sacramento Public Television Station filmed a half-hour special at our home near Taylorsville. Plumas County promoted Dad’s work and this in turn brought in sales at the museum that contributed to the operating funds.

In a 1974 fundraising letter Norma J. Carr, then Secretary-Treasurer of the Board of Trustees, reported that in the first five years “the multi-purpose Plumas County Museum and Chamber of Commerce Building hosted over 300 different historical, cultural, educational and informational exhibits and functions viewed by over 80,000 visitors. With a paid staff of two persons and a great deal of volunteer help, the Plumas County Museum has already gained statewide attention and notoriety.” Today, the museum has diversified even further.

“We are an all-encompassing facility for the whole county,” Lawson said. “This is the Plumas County Museum not the Quincy Museum.” He explained that the entire region, the whole Feather River Watershed and its history are important to the museum:

Whether you use anything in the museum on a regular basis or not, the memoirs and papers of the pioneers are here, but we are not here just for people to check out information, we also hold tangible objects passed down through generations from the pioneer families. People gave us the objects and records, for us to take care of and know they will be here for future generations. A lot of these are things we may never see again. Maybe a lot of people had the item years ago, but they have been thrown away, given away, burned up or lost in floods. We have everything from textiles: clothing, shoes, hats, household items, kitchen utensils, furniture, industrial tools, cameras, photography components and darkroom equipment. We have a little bit of everything that represents what life was in Plumas County over the last 170 years for Euro-American culture, plus items that represent the life ways of the Indigenous Maidu.

Lawson said the various museums around the county each serve an important purpose as well.

We can’t do it all here. I don’t feel we are in competition with the other museums around the county at all. I’ve worked with a lot of them to help them hone their accessioning and curatorial skills: so we aren’t throwing things in a corner or letting them get damaged. I help them pick out computer systems and help them get going. We are lucky to have that brochure that shows we have 11 museums now in the county. It could be promoted more than it is, but the county doesn’t spend money on things that bring money in like museums and the chambers of commerce. A lot of people move here because of us, or after seeing our information.

He also filled me in on the history of the Plumas County Museum before it moved into the current building.

The museum has been part of County Courthouse planning since the courthouse opened in 1921. The room where the recorder’s office is now, that was called the memorial room. A lot of the cases in the County Museum now, were in that room. We were one of 19 departments. The county-funded everything: the electricity, heat and so on. After we moved to Jackson Street, they formed a non-profit group to accept donations, so they are giving us less of the general fund now. Things are better than they were for a while, but not ideal because I still have the same extended workload, I’m behind from having no help for a couple of years. I used to have three people and I’m still trying to do the work of three people. With part-time people, you don’t have as much continuity as with full-time folks. I have to spend more time running around making sure they are getting everything done.

Besides cataloging and developing a database and system for looking up everything, the museum undertakes many other endeavors. Having local people and children enjoy the museum Lawson said was one of the most satifying aspects of his job.

We have other projects like maintaining the historic buildings we care for like the Hall-Lowry House and the Old Taylorsville School. If you saw the faces of fourth-graders when they come here for their living history program where they have hands-on heritage skills: making candles, washing clothes on a washboard, making butter, cooking biscuits on a wood stove, and how excited they are about it. It makes it feel like it is worth it to do this. When I see them again 20 years later, they say that was one thing they remembered about the museum and how much fun they had. They then bring in their kids. When you get a little older you start thinking about your roots and the people before you. A lot of people who live here came from somewhere else and don’t have as much of a tie to the history here, but they still want to know, ‘Who had the house before me?’ or ‘Who lived in this valley before.’ We have that information to share.

Today, besides the museum’s many exhibits, it also offers a wide variety of services and programs including:

  • School Tours
  • Bus tours throughout the county featuring historical and cultural highlights
  • Historical and cultural presentations
  • Exhibit design and implementation
  • Local artist shows and receptions
  • 1878 Variel Home tours and restoration work
  • Maintenance of the 1860 Goodwin Law Office
  • Archival Library research and resources
  • Artifact accessioning and conservation
  • Civic and community presentations
  • 4th Grade Living History program
  • Women’s History Luncheon program
  • Spanish Peak Lumber Co. Railroad project
  • Tourism information and referral services
  • 1888 Peppard Cabin tours
  • 1857 Pioneer School tours

In 2017, museum director Scott Lawson led a group tour of Historic Sierra Valley Ranches. The tour visited the Dotta Ranch, Goss Ranch, Smith Ranch, Folchi Ranch, Beckwourth Masonic Hall and other points of interest. The museum also recently put together a grant application and received funding from the Wahl Foundation to help restore the Historic 1864 Taylorsville School, which Plumas County bought from the Native Sons of the Golden West in 2000. Furniture maker Richard Davis of Quincy rebuilt and restored the windows, among other repairs in 2018. The Plumas County Museum today remains a vital and active part of historic preservation and maintaining archives all over the county.

Details:

Plumas County Museum

500 Jackson Street (Behind the County Courthouse)

Quincy, California

Contact Info:

Scott Lawson, Director and Curator

Paul Russell, Assistant Director

530-283-6320

pcmuseum@psln.com

Trustees:

Ken Bernard                       530-283-3965                Graeagle

Charlie Brown                     283-3416                        Quincy

Don Clark                            836-2586                       Graeagle/Mohawk Valley

Pat Cook                             836-4029                        Graeagle (President)

Pete Dryer                          283-2130                         Twain

Bob Edwards                     283-1728                         Quincy

Jerry Holland                     283-5328                         American Valley

Sandra Lee                         927-7442                        Quincy

Gaye Porter                        283-0777                        Quincy

Jerry Thomas                     283-4231                        Quincy/American Valley

Diane Uchytil                     283-3305                         American Valley

Why Photography Galleries, Curators And Collectors Like Limited Editions

March 12th, 2013

Important Announcement: Philip Hyde Authorized Archival Prints, Largest Sizes Converted To Limited Editions

Misty Morning, Indian Creek, Northern Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, 1983 by Philip Hyde. The original color transparency went missing and this image has not been printed or published for over 20 years. With the digital age it can again be printed. West Coast Imaging produced the new file from a scan by their Creo CCD Flatbed Scanner of a Philip Hyde original dye transfer print.

Misty Morning, Indian Creek, Northern Sierra Nevada, California, 1983 by Philip Hyde. Because the original color transparency was missing, this image has not been printed or published for over 25 years. With the digital age it can again be printed. West Coast Imaging produced the new file from a scan by their Creo CCD Flatbed Scanner of a Philip Hyde original dye transfer print. This is another Philip Hyde photograph that is close to selling 10 prints, at which point it will go up in value $100 in all sizes. Because this photograph is not available as a 32X40 print, the limited edition is only available in the 24X30 size.

(See the photograph large: “Misty Morning, Indian Creek, Northern Sierra Nevada, California.”)

After much research and deliberation, I have decided to take the advice of many photographers, photography gallery owners, collectors, museum curators, archive collection managers, appraisers, connoisseurs, critics and nearly every other established expert in the art of photography that I have spoken with: to change the largest Philip Hyde authorized archival lightjet or digital prints to limited editions of 50.

That’s right, you read correctly, from now on the two largest sizes, 24X30 and 32X40 Philip Hyde archival lightjet or digital prints will be offered in limited editions of only 50 prints from either size of each image. Not 50 24X30’s plus 50 32X40’s, but 50 prints total in either size. The remaining Philip Hyde archival print sizes: 8X10, 11X14, 16X20 and 20X24 will still be offered in an open numbered edition called the Philip Hyde authorized “Special Edition.”

In my research I found that only photographers were against limited editions and only a minority of photographers at that. One talented and prominent photographer and writer, who I agree with on many other subjects, Guy Tal, has even gone so far as to suggest that limited edition prints are unethical because he believes they manipulate the market, creating a false scarcity and an “inflated value.” His reasoning is that “manufacturing scarcity” through limiting editions goes against the goals of artists “to inspire, to share, to make accessible, to celebrate and other noble causes often associated with photography of natural things.” He proposes that “artificial scarcity” is not the same as “real scarcity.” If you read his blog post, “The Ethics of Limited Editions,” you may understand why he looks at it this way. The comments on his blog post are many and diverse. In my observation, some photographers who dislike limited editions look at it mainly from their own perspective and not that of the collector or even casual print buyer. For primarily this reason, these photographers overlook the real benefits of limited editions.

Who Brought Limited Editions To Landscape Photography?

Is it not ironic then, that it was Ansel Adams and later Galen Rowell, who did the most to popularize both landscape photography and limited editions in the genre? Some landscape photographers who do not like limited editions claim that Ansel Adams did not produce limited edition. This may be true of the prints he made himself, but his Special Edition prints made in his darkroom by an assistant and other editions were limited. Some early well-known landscape photographers also invented the now ethically questionable practice of size specific limited editions. They would offer 16X20 prints of a certain image as a limited edition of say 200. Once the edition of 200 sold out, they would then offer a limited edition of 15X18 prints of the same image. Fear and mistrust of these types of limited editions are what caused collectors to be wary of limited editions of digital prints when they were first introduced. When digital prints originally began to appear, Photography galleries and collectors believed that it was easier to make digital prints than traditional color or black and white prints. They feared that photographers would break their own self-imposed edition limits, or work around the limits by issuing different sizes or implementing some other ploy.

Certainly limited editions of 250, 500 or more than 1,000 are mirages. Print runs of this size only create the perception and carry the name of “limited editions.” They are not truly limited because few nature or landscape photographers will ever sell that many of one image out of their many prints offered.

What Photography Gallery Owners And Collectors Like

I remember a conversation I had with Terry Etherton, an esteemed photography dealer and owner of the Etherton Gallery in Tucson, Arizona. I asked his opinion whether I ought to offer my father’s photographer authorized archival digital prints in limited editions or not. I explained that the current numbered Special Edition was not a limited edition, but would be limited by its pricing structure. That is, each time 10 prints sell in each image, that image goes up $100 in all sizes. For example, we have already sold more than 10 prints of “Virginia Creeper, Northern Sierra.” It is priced at $275 for an 8X10, $425 for 11X14, $575 for 16X20 and so on rather than the regular pricing of the rest of Dad’s photographs of $175 for 8X10, $325 for 11X14, $475 for 16X20, etc. After “Virginia Creeper” has sold 100 prints, the 8X10s will sell for $1175, the 11X14s will sell for $1325, the 16X20s will be $1475 and so on. Terry Etherton said that was OK, but limited editions would be simpler. I said that if I did switch to limited editions, I would probably limit them to perhaps 75, 100 or even as much as 200. He said, “I was thinking maybe 25 or 50. Collectors want something rare.” Most of the other photography galleries whose owners I talked to concurred with Mr. Etherton.

Collectors not only like, but purposely seek out vintage prints and even modern photographs that are printed in limited editions or are rare for some other reason. Photography galleries, museum curators and archivists like limited editions too. Why? Very simply, because whenever there is less of anything valuable, the less of it there is, the more valuable it becomes. This is not “manufactured” or “artificial” and even if it were, whenever there is less quantity, regardless of the reason or the cause, there is more value. Collectors want to have the satisfaction of knowing that what they have is something unique or nearly unique. They want to pay more to obtain art that they know will not be mass-produced. It is no more complicated or psychologically involved than that.

Black And White Magazine On Digital Print Values

Lorraine Anne Davis MA, MFA, a fine art photography appraiser since 1984 and columnist for Black and White Magazine, has managed, curated or consulted with many of the world’s most significant photography collections including the Paul Strand Archive. She wrote an article in the April 2009, Issue 66 of Black and White Magazine titled, “Concerning Digital Reprints.” Her article explained that digital prints are becoming more accepted and collectible, but that “posthumous” digital reprints of an artist who mainly printed with other processes are ubiquitous, but sometimes questionable in appraisal value. Indeed, according to Davis, the intent of the artist or the print maker is what determines value. For more about her article see the Fine Art Photography Collectors Resource Blog post called, “Photography Galleries, Collectors, Appraisers And Digital Prints.”

Having learned to print from Ansel Adams, Edward Weston and Minor White, my father produced his own fine art gelatin silver prints, dye transfer prints from color film and later Cibachrome color prints. He had Wally McGalliard in Los Angeles print all of his large exhibition prints using a C-print process. In 1998, master landscape photographer Carr Clifton restored two of Dad’s photographs. From then on Dad authorized Carr Clifton to print for him. Wally McGalliard retired around the same time and Carr Clifton’s new archival digital prints became the preferred printing process for Philip Hyde Photography. When Dad was making his own prints from color film, he only made 2-8 prints of each image. Thus, I no longer have many prints left of many of his most well known photographs. We expanded the line of digital prints offered mainly to Dad’s top images that have nearly or completely sold out and those that have been damaged in some way. Peter Fetterman, the number one photography dealer in Southern California, said producing any digital prints at all might confuse the market, but I imagine “the market” would rather be confused than not able to obtain any of Dad’s best photographs at all.

Are All Digital Prints Equal?

These archival lightjet or digital prints are very different from most digital prints. First of all they are made from high resolution Tango drum scans of large format 4X5, 5X7 or 8X10 color film. The resulting raw file is 800 MG to 6 Gigs in size and contains far more detail and a much wider range and depth of color than any digital camera capture today. A good analogy is why music lovers like vinyl LP records better than CDs. Analog sound is fuller, richer, more melodious and less metallic sounding because the sound curve is smooth, containing a continuous breakdown of all the sound, whereas the digital sound curve, when magnified, is a stairstep of sound with little pieces of the sound missing all along the “curve.” Tango drum Scans of large format original color film transparencies contain a much smoother color curve and much more of the colors in the continuum. Because of this, at first a drum scan comes out appearing dull in color, also due to adjusting the settings to obtain as much detail from the highlights and shadows as possible. The huge raw file must then be “developed” or “post-processed” in Photoshop by a seasoned restoration expert to most effectively match the way my father printed the image.

Carr Clifton’s expert Photoshop work is expensive and time consuming for both of us as we print a proof, change the digital file, print another proof and change the digital image again. Also, since many of Dad’s original color film transparencies and black and white film negatives are beaten up with scratches, pock marks, fading and all sorts of other damage due to age and being sent out to publishers so often, a great deal of restoration and cleanup work is necessary as each image gets printed larger and larger. The archival digital prints Carr Clifton and I have made are not considered posthumous prints because Dad authorized them eight years before his death in 2006 and two years before he lost his eyesight in 2000. Also, they are not technically even digital prints any more at all because they are now printed on a lightjet printer. The lightjet printing process does not produce the image on the paper with 11 inks the way the fine art digital printing process does, the lightjet process is actually a chromogenic or full color spectrum, photographic process whereby the paper is exposed with light much like the old darkroom printing processes. This produces a richer, even more full-spectrum color emulsion with better definition and contrast, even more like an analog vintage print. Lightjet prints are also more environmentally friendly not using toxic inks and wasting less paper and ink due to fewer printing mistakes. Some tests claim inkjet digital prints will outlast lightjet prints, but some tests claim lightjet prints will outlast digital prints. Either way, lightjet prints on Fuji Crystal Archive paper when placed side-by-side with digital prints win hands down in their aesthetic appeal, print consistency and print quality.

What A Professional Appraiser, Some Photography Dealers And A Few Museum Curators Said

I contacted Lorraine Anne Davis in December 2009 and wrote that I enjoyed her informative article in Black and White Magazine. I also explained what Carr Clifton and I were doing and how we had enjoyed compliments from top photography galleries and major museums including the Oakland Museum and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, whose head photography curators had seen the archival digital prints. I told her that I planned at some point to write about the subject and would she offer her expert opinion on what we were doing, even without seeing the prints. I explained that I wished to overcome the stigma sometimes attached to heirs making prints and be sure to bring out the archival digital prints in such a way that they would be accepted, respected, collected and go up in value.

I quote her reply in full:

I am afraid I am too busy to answer in depth. Just limit the editions and it doesn’t matter what the process is. Not any more – but collectors want to think what they have is “rare” –

You can make large editions of small prints and very limited of larger prints –

Blind stamp or holograph to protect originality –

A certificate or sticker of authenticity can be reproduced by anyone – certificates of authenticity are often issued with fakes – appraisers don’t even consider them, they are the easiest things to fake. It’s somewhat of a joke, actually – and It isn’t necessary of you keep track of the editions.

Unless your father’s work starts selling for over 100,000 per print, no one is going to make fakes –

Man Ray, Peter Beard, Hine and 19th C dags have some fakes – but Hine and Man Ray printers had the negs –and were selling very high

Sorry to be so brief

All my articles will be posted on my web site in the next weeks –

Happy Holidays – Lorraine

In my reply I of course thanked her and said, “This is quite a bit of information actually and very generous of you to advise.” Based on her guidance and much other research and conversations with people like Richard Gadd, previous Director of the Monterey Museum of Art, currently Director of the Weston Gallery in Carmel; Sandra S. Phillips, Senior Curator of Photography, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Michael and Jeanne Adams of the Ansel Adams Gallery; Hal Gould and Loretta Young-Gautier of Camera Obscura Gallery in Denver; Andrew Smith and John Boland of Santa Fe; Scott Nichols and Susan Friedwald of San Francisco; Stefan Kirkeby of Smith Andersen North in San Anselmo, California; Robert Yellowlees and Tony Casadonte of Lumiere Gallery and the High Museum of Art in Atlanta; Drew Johnson Curator of Photography and Visual Culture at the Oakland Museum and many others, I have decided to make the changes mentioned above to the two largest sizes of my father’s archival lightjet and digital prints. Dad’s 24X30 and 32X40 archival lightjet and digital prints will from now on be produced in limited editions of 50 prints per image.

The Results And Bottom Line

For the remainder of this year of 2013 or whenever one image sells more than five prints, these limited edition prints from color film originals will be PRICED THE SAME AS THEY ARE NOW! That is, prints in LIMITED EDITIONS of only 50 will remain the same price until they either sell five prints or until December 31, 2013. After that they will go up an average of $200 in each size (see the chart below for details.) This represents a 15 percent savings.

Prices Now            Unmatted/Unframed                      Matted                         Matted & Framed

24X30                                      925                                    1050                                    1175

32X40                                    1175                                    1325                                    1475

 

Prices After            Unmatted/Unframed                     Matted                         Matted & Framed

24X30                                    1100                                    1225                                    1350

32X40                                    1300                                    1450                                    1600

For more information on Philip Hyde archival lightjet and digital prints from color film see: “About Fuji Crystal Archive Chromogenic Fine Art Prints,” as well as the blog post mentioned above called, “Photography Galleries, Collectors, Appraisers And Digital Prints.”

What do you think? Are we on the right track? Would it be wise to keep the editions the same as they are now? Print a completely open edition with no numbering? Produce the entire line of prints as limited editions?

Peter Fetterman Gallery Now Representing Philip Hyde

May 18th, 2011

The Celebrated Peter Fetterman Gallery Of Santa Monica, California Is Now Representing The Pioneer Fine Art Landscape Photography Of Philip Hyde

 

Corn Lily Leaves, Proposed North Cascades National Park, Washington, 1959 copyright Philip Hyde. One of the original vintage black and white prints on consignment at the Peter Fetterman Gallery.

The Peter Fetterman Galleryhouses one of the largest inventories of classic 20th Century photography in the United States. The Peter Fetterman Gallery is also the number one photography dealer in Southern California and a member of AIPAD, the Association of International Photography Art Dealers.

Peter Fetterman came to the Los Angeles area from his birth city of London, England over 30 years ago. Peter Fetterman’s first exposure to still photography, through Hollywood while he worked as a filmmaker, interested him in pursuing the art of photography as a collector. Over 20 years ago, Peter Fetterman established his first photography gallery. In 1994, he became a pioneer tenant of Bergamot Station, the Santa Monica Center of the Arts when it first opened.

The diverse holding of the Peter Fetterman Gallery today include work by Henri Cartier-Bresson, Sabastiao Salgado, Ansel Adams, Paul Caponigro, Willy Ronis, Andre Kerstez, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Lillian Bassman and now pioneer landscape photographer Philip Hyde.

The Getty Museum And Documentary Photography

The Getty Museum of Los Angeles recently acquired a major selection black and white prints by the social documentary photographer Sabastiao Salgado. Peter Fetterman is largely responsible for the development of Sabastiao Salgado in the US and in Europe. Sabastiao Salgado, originally from Brazil, now lives in Paris. He was a photojournalist for such agencies as Sygma, Gamma and in 1979 he joined Magnum. The Wikipedia article on Sebastiao Salgado said, “He is particularly noted for his social documentary photography of workers in less developed nations.” Photographer Hal Gould, founding member of AIPAD and of Camera Obscura Gallery of Denver, Colorado, said that Sabastiao Salgado is one of the 21st Century’s most important photographers. Hal Gould gave Sabastiao Salgado his first US Exhibition at Camera Obscura Gallery. To Read more about Camera Obscura Gallery see the blog post, “Hal Gould And Camera Obscura: 50 Years Of Photography Advocacy.” Philip Hyde exhibited at Camera Obscura Gallery twice: once in the 1970s as part of a group show and once in September-October 2010 as one of the last exhibitions at Camera Obscura Gallery see the blog posts, “Philip Hyde’s Mountain Landscapes at Camera Obscura Gallery,” or “Vintage And Digital Prints Together In One Exhibition.”

More recently Sabastiao Salgado’s Genesis project on landscapes and wildlife in their original settings helped spark Peter Fetterman’s interest in representing the best landscape photographers who made their own film era vintage prints. Philip Hyde was one of the few photographers of the 20th Century who was considered a master of both color landscape photography and black and white photography, as well as hand print making in both mediums.

Peter Fetterman On Collecting Photography

What Peter Fetterman advises about collecting photography:

One of the wonderful things about photography is that it is still possible to build up a significant collection for relatively small sums of money, if you go about it in a smart way. You may love Modigliani, or Rubens, or Rembrandt or Matisse but for most of us that would be fantasy collecting. Fortunately it is still possible to acquire images by the equivalent masters of photography, at an accessible level, and in a market that has so far only ever gone up in value.

‘How do I go about it?’ you may be wondering. The best advice I give my new clients is to do what I call “photo aerobics.” Exercise your eye. Take every opportunity to look at as many images as you can, be it in museum shows, galleries, art fairs, and build up a library of photography books. As in any field of collecting the more knowledge you can acquire the greater the pleasure you are going to experience from the whole process. Find a dealer you can communicate with who is willing to share their own knowledge and expertise with you. Finding the photographs that inspire you is a highly creative endeavor in itself, and can even be an act of self-discovery. As your learning curve grows you will soon understand and appreciate the difference between a silver print and a platinum print, a vintage print and a modern print.

Happily it is still possible to buy an important print in the $1000-$5000 range, and by important I mean a photograph that is going to have longevity not only in terms of the image itself, but also the reputation and importance of the artist. To do this today in any other medium is virtually impossible. This will of course not always be the case with photography either. The realities of increasing demand as more and more collectors enter the arena, will mean a diminishing supply of available of affordable prints of classic images by recognized masters.

Peter Fetterman Is Now Working To Develop Philip Hyde Collections In More Major Museums

The Peter Fetterman Gallery offers a large selection of Philip Hyde vintage black and white silver prints and vintage color dye transfer and Cibachrome prints, most of which are still in the price range mentioned above. Peter Fetterman has also already begun talking to more world-class museums about Philip Hyde. World class venues that have shown or collected Philip Hyde include The Smithsonian, New York’s Museum of Modern Art, Time-Life, The Cosmos Club, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, University of Arizona in Tucson Center For Creative Photography, National Geographic Society, George Eastman House, Oakland Museum, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, California Academy of Sciences, Yosemite National Park Visitor’s Center, Grand Canyon National Park Visitor’s Center, the Ansel Adams Gallery, Weston Gallery, Alaska State Museum and many others.

Tenth Digital Print Of “Virginia Creeper” Sold, Price Goes Up

September 15th, 2010

Virginia Creeper, Northern Sierra Nevada, California, 1977 by Philip Hyde. Appeared on more magazine covers than any other Philip Hyde photograph including Audubon Magazine, Darkroom Magazine and others.

On Friday, September 3, 2010 Mountain Light Gallery sold the 10th archival fine art digital print of “Virginia Creeper, Northern Sierra Nevada, California, 1977.” For the next 10 prints “Virginia Creeper” archival fine art digital prints will be $100 higher in all sizes. After an additional 10 prints sell, the price will go up another $100 and so on. For example for unmatted/unframed prints, “Virginia Creeper” pricing for the next 10 prints will be:

8 X 10          $275

11 X 14          425

16 X 20          575

20 X 24          775

24 X 30        1025

32 X 40        1275

Likewise for matted and framed prints, just add $100 to the corresponding value on the regular price sheet found at Philip Hyde Photography under the tab INFO and About Archival Fine Art Digital Prints or see the blog post, “About Archival Fine Art Digital Prints” that contains similar information.

Archival fine art digital prints are released in numbered special editions. Print numbers limited by pricing. After 100 prints sell of a particular image, prints of that photograph will be valued at $1,000 more than they were to begin with, or than other prints. Archival fine art digital prints have been made by Carr Clifton, a 30-year protege of Philip Hyde, since 1999, seven years before the older landscape photographer died. Philip Hyde oversaw and authorized Carr Clifton to make the archival fine art digital prints. We still have at least five of the archival fine art digital prints Philip Hyde signed.

As start-up costs are paid off, a portion of funds will go to environmental causes and to preservation and care of Philip Hyde’s original film.

About Archival Fine Art Digital Prints

July 19th, 2010

Archival Fine Art Digital Prints | Fine Art Photography | Print Making

For more information about NEW RELEASES see the blog post, “New Releases Now At Special Introductory Pricing.” To see the photographs go to Philip Hyde Photography.

Printing Materials And Processes

Philip Hyde archival fine art digital prints in color were printed in 2008, 2009 and the beginning of 2010 with a 13-ink Epson 9800 Inkjet printer on Premium Luster paper. The archival fine art digital prints in black and white were printed in the first half of 2009 on a 16-ink Epson 11880 Inkjet printer on Premium Luster paper and in the second half of 2009 and beyond on Crane Silver Rag paper. The color archival digital prints beginning in 2010 are now printed with a Lightjet 5000 printer on Fuji Crystal Archive paper, in which case they are not pigment prints but chromogenic prints digitally exposed with light. On occasion the color prints are also printed with the Epson 9800 on a new archival 100 percent cotton rag paper. The life of any of these prints is much longer than those of print making methods of the past. In addition, the process of translating a 4X5 or 5X7 film original transparency or negative into digital print-ready form is complicated, expensive, time consuming and expert labor intensive. The highest quality equipment and methods known are used at each step starting with drum scanning and ending with print preparation.

Fine Art Photographer And Print Maker Carr Clifton

Landscape photographer and print maker Carr Clifton has made archival fine art digital prints for Philip Hyde since 1998, eight years before Philip Hyde passed on. When Carr Clifton expressed interest in photography over 35 years ago, his mother took him to meet Philip Hyde who happened to be a neighbor. From then on Philip Hyde was a mentor and friend to Carr Clifton. Carr Clifton has become a highly respected outdoor photographer in his own right. The two landscape photographers worked on several book projects together. Also, side-by-side for many years their photographs dominated the Sierra Club Calendars that contained the work of the most famous landscape photographers of the time.

Philip Hyde authorized and signed five of the new archival fine art digital prints before he passed on. The new prints are produced by Philip Hyde’s son, David Leland Hyde and Carr Clifton. This equates with Brett Weston or Cole Weston printing Edward Weston’s photographs, as other famous photographers heirs have done. Alan Ross has made special edition Ansel Adams prints for many years. A great amount of time, effort and expense has gone into matching as close as possible the way that Philip Hyde printed the photographs. Having been around Philip Hyde for many years, both David Leland Hyde and Carr Clifton work to maintain Philip Hyde’s straight photography aesthetics of limiting color saturation and maintaining tasteful photo realism when no Philip Hyde model print is available.

Rare Philip Hyde Original Prints Often Long Sold Out

Philip Hyde original prints are very rare and most of the best images have long sold out. Also, because Philip Hyde lost his eyesight, many of his best later portraits, cityscapes, and landscape photographs were never printed. When Philip Hyde was print making himself, he produced traditional black and white silver gelatin prints, color dye-transfer prints and color Cibachrome prints. He did not print the same best images over and over like many photographers. Each time he came home from a landscape photography trip, he printed only 2 or 4 color prints from that excursion. If there was an order for more he might print as many as 2 to 4 more prints given the time, difficulty and cost of color print making. In the earlier days before his transition to color in the early to mid 1970s, the black and white prints were made in edtions of 4 or 6. On rare occasions with only a few of the images, he printed as many as 10 or 12 prints. After printing from one project, he would go on a new trip, return and print the new images from the new outing. He rarely went back and printed older images. As a result, most prints of the well-known images are now gone.

New Archival Fine Art Digital Prints Allow Collectors To Enjoy New Releases And Old Favorites Again

The new archival fine art digital prints allow collectors and fans of landscape photography to enjoy new releases and the old favorites that in many cases have not been printed or exhibited for decades. The archival fine art digital prints are limited in production by the expense and difficulty of translation from large format film to quality digital images. Each of the archival fine art digital prints are produced in special editions that are numbered. The prints of any given photograph go up in price $100 in all print sizes each time 10 prints of any size sell. For example, “Virginia Creeper” has sold nearly 10 prints and will go up in price $100 soon. Those photographs that sell higher quantities will eventually become much higher valued than the others. For example, when 200 prints of an image have sold, it will be valued at $2,000 more in all print sizes than it was to begin with and $2,000 more than prints of the other photographs. This will not only increase perceived and actual value of the prints over time, but will limit production and sales of each print and make them more attractive to collectors.

The Mission, In Part

A portion of proceeds from fine art digital print sales will fund green energy development, land conservation and other environmental causes. Philip Hyde’s prints are in permanent collections in institutions such as The Smithsonian, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, George Eastman House, Time Life Gallery, California Academy of Sciences, The International Center of Photography and The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

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See Philip Hyde Photography for Philip Hyde Archival Fine Art Digital Prints Pricing

For print acquisitions, questions or to just say hi, please contact:
David Leland Hyde
prints [at] philiphyde [dot] com
Orders can also be placed on the Philip Hyde Photography Website through the Portfolios that contain a Shopping Cart.

The Experts On Starting A Photography Collection 1

May 17th, 2010

(See Also Special Announcement Below)

Photography Has Proven One Of The Most Profitable And Satisfying Art Forms To Collect.

How Do The Experts Recommend To Start A Collection?

Thunderstorm Over The Grand Canyon, alternately titled Thunderstorm Over Navajo Country from The Grand Canyon North Rim, Arizona, 1963 by Philip Hyde. Exhibited at the International Center of Photography, New York, "Master Photographs: Photography In The Fine Arts" Exhibition. Became a book called "Master Photographs: From 'Photography In The Fine Arts' Exhibitions, 1959-1967" with essays by Norman Cousins and others.

(See the photograph full screen Click Here.)

The maturing of photography as an art form has been accompanied by an explosion of interest both in the enjoyment and creation of photographs. With the advent of digital cameras and camera phones, nearly everyone is now making images. Interest in collecting photography has also grown dramatically, not to mention the value of some photographs.

In a November 2006 Fortune Magazine Article titled, “Investors Zoom In On Photography,” Stephen Milioti wrote that in the decade from 1996 to 2006, a photographic print by Helmut Newton “enjoyed better price appreciation than a comparable investment in an S&P 500 index fund, General Electric Stock, or ten-year treasury bonds. And Newton isn’t the only photographer whose prices are on the rise.” Prices and demand fell off in 2008 and 2009 but are rebounding well in 2010. >>>> READ MORE >>>>

(Goes to Fine Art Photography Collector’s Resource Blog at http://philiphydephotographycollector.com/)

Special Announcement: Companion Blog to Landscape Photography Blogger called Fine Art Photography Collector’s Resource…

Fine Art Photography Collector’s Resource Blog…

…Was launched in Boulder, Colorado on February 25, 2010

This blog will offer general information about collecting photography and share the personal journey of David Leland Hyde as he expands his personal collection and learns more about collecting photography. It will also provide a resource to those interested in learning about Philip Hyde’s vintage and original prints, as well as the development of the special edition numbered archival fine art digital prints made by David Leland Hyde and Carr Clifton of Philip Hyde’s rare and sold out works. The Fine Art Photography Collector’s Resource Blog will not be updated as often as Landscape Photography Blogger – The Main Blog. Blog posts will be written on this new resource blog a few times a month or to announce important events.

See also the blog post, “Photography And Art Dealers Rebound In 2010.”

New Philip Hyde Releases At Mountain Light Gallery Exhibition

May 4th, 2010

New Philip Hyde Photographs Never Before Seen By the Public Make A World Premier In The Exhibition At Galen Rowell’s Mountain Light Gallery

Waiting For The Train, Oaxaca Train Station, Oaxaca, Mexico, 1990 by Philip Hyde. Never before printed or published.

(See the photograph full screen Click Here.)

Philip Hyde’s “Waiting For The Train, Oaxaca Train Station, Oaxaca, Mexico” photographed in 1990 will be part of the “Pioneer Photography of Philip Hyde Exhibition at Mountain Light Gallery” in Bishop, California opening May 8 and running through August 31, 2010. (See also the announcing blog post, “Photography Of Philip Hyde At Mountain Light Gallery” and the related blog post,  “Galen Rowell, Philip Hyde And Outdoor Photographer Style.”) The people photograph, “Men of Oaxaca” breaks the pattern of the typical Philip Hyde landscape photograph. Philip Hyde made a good number of people portraits but rarely published or printed them. “Waiting For The Train, Oaxaca Train Station” is also unusual for Philip Hyde in that it was photographed with a 35 mm camera. While “Waiting For The Train” can be viewed on the Philip Hyde Website, several other new releases in the exhibition are not even on the website yet and have not been printed or published for many years or ever.

One release that is new to archival fine art digital prints is a 1968 photograph called, “Base of Havasu Falls, Havasupai Indian Reservation, Arizona.” Philip Hyde made only two dye transfer prints of this image that are long gone. It was never publicly exhibited as far as the records show. This will be the first gallery exhibition for this photograph. The restoration of this image was very time-consuming because the original Kodak E-3 transparency has deteriorated significantly. The raw drum scan of the original transparency had an orange-magenta caste overall with concentrated streaks, fingerprints and other blotches in the water throughout. Carr Clifton spent over 10 hours working on this one photograph. His process I will write up in another blog post, but suffice now to say that it involved a complex combination of the lasso tool, hue, saturation, color adjustment, color balance, select color, edit-fill, and several other general tools in Photoshop to get all of the flaws out and make the white water look right.

Another photograph that will appear in the Mountain Light Gallery Exhibition that Philip Hyde never printed but that was published by the Sierra Club is “Mt. Jefferson, Jefferson Wilderness Area, Oregon Cascades, Oregon” made in 1959. This photograph the Sierra Club published as a beautiful postcard in 1961. The original transparency and drum scan of it show large, dark forested areas. In the digital age, we were able to lighten the nearly black forests without changing the character of the photograph. As an archival fine art digital print this image has become more beautiful than ever. The lightening of the dark areas has brought out remarkable features in the finished print that could never have been achieved with any older printing process. Philip Hyde had a packer guide he and Ardis Hyde’s gear into the Jefferson Wilderness Area by horseback, while Ardis and Philip Hyde hiked in on foot. Philip Hyde went in to get photographs of the Jefferson Wilderness Area because it had been part of a proposed Oregon Cascades National Park that had some renewed interest in 1959 but not enough to go beyond speculation.

Pioneer Basin, Fourth Recess, John Muir Wilderness, Sierra Nevada High Country, California, 1970 by Philip Hyde. Never before printed or published.

Philip Hyde photographed “Pioneer Basin, Fourth Recess, John Muir Wilderness, Sierra Nevada High Country, California” in 1970. This beautiful photograph sat in the files and was never published or printed. In 2008 it was drum scanned and sat in digital form for another year and a half. Finally near the end of 2009, in search of more good California photographs, particularly of the High Sierra, and considering another image of Kearsarge Lake, I showed “Pioneer Basin, Fourth Recess” to Carr Clifton and he agreed that it ought to be prepared for printing. We printed an 8X10 proof that needed work. Carr Clifton is the Photoshop genius, but I sit in with him sometimes and make suggestions. We at times disagree, but that makes for good discussions and usually better results. I greatly respect him and his photography and he respects my work ethic and how dedicated I am to doing what my father would like. In the case of “Pioneer Basin, Fourth Recess” after we fixed a few technical problems and made another 8X10, it turned out beautifully. Then we printed an 11X14, Wow. We were so enthused about the image that I decided to put it in my 11X14 portfolio book that I take everywhere to show. I decided that we had to print a 16X20 and put it in the Mountain Light Gallery Exhibition. I put it on the website for a while but took it down to await a special announcement like this.

The three new releases that are not yet up on the website will remain off the website and only viewable at Mountain Light Gallery until the exhibition is over at the end of August. In addition to the four prints mentioned above that will be completely new, the exhibition will include 14 images that have never been exhibited before this Century. That makes 18 new prints that will be shown for the first time since Philip Hyde passed on.

Besides new prints, the Mountain Light Gallery Exhibition will include an original black and white silver print of Philip Hyde’s iconic “Minarets From Tarn Above Lake Ediza, Ansel Adams Wilderness, Sierra Nevada, California, 1950.” This photograph of the Minarets Ansel Adams said he liked better than his own. Also in the show will be an original color Cibachrome print of  “Ice On Continental Divide, Yoho National Park, British Columbia, Canada, 1992.” This newer Canadian Rockies image is of sheer rock peaks with forested foothills. Come see all of the new imagery.

Read a Recent Interview of me by Richard Wong regarding my work with Philip Hyde Photography: Son of Environmental Photography Pioneer David Leland Hyde Interview.

Pioneering Photography of Philip Hyde Exhibition
May 8 Through August 31, 2010

Talk and Opening Reception May 8

Galen Rowell’s Mountain Light Gallery
106 South Main Street
Bishop, California
760-873-7700

Philip Hyde Now Represented by One of the First Fine Art Photography Galleries

February 26th, 2010

New Representation of Philip Hyde by Camera Obscura Gallery in Denver, Colorado

Hal Gould In The Camera Obscura Gallery, 2002, by Kurt Edward Fishback.

For nearly 50 years, Hal Gould has operated showcases for fine art photography. In 1963, he founded the non-profit Colorado Photographic Art Center — one of the first venues in the world devoted exclusively to showing and promoting photography as a medium for fine art. In 1979, the center transformed into The Camera Obscura Gallery, today still in its original location at 13th Street and Bannock Street in Denver, Colorado.

Camera Obscura Gallery has since built a reputation for exhibiting masters such as Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Brett Weston, Andre Kertesz, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Imogen Cunningham, Paul Strand, Edward S. Curtis, Sebastiao Salgado, Philippe Halsman, W. Eugene Smith and many others. Hal Gould’s collection at the gallery is one of the most diverse between the East Coast and West Coast of the United States. The collection on display at Camera Obscura contains some of the earliest photographs starting in 1839, with a large selection from the 1800s and early 1900s.

The Colorado Photographic Art Center and the Camera Obscura Gallery have held exhibitions of the work of many prominent western photographers, one of whom was Philip Hyde as part of a group show in the early 1970s. The Camera Obscura Gallery now has on display a 16X20 archival fine art digital print of Philip Hyde’s 1971 “Mt. Denali, Reflection Pond, Denali National Park, Alaska.” Philip Hyde’s artist statement, biography and other information is now listed under artists on the Camera Obscura Gallery website. The Camera Obscura Gallery also has a magnificent portfolio book of 8X10 archival fine art digital prints of 47 of Philip Hyde’s best photographs.

Hal Gould’s long experience in both commercial and fine art photography, and collecting, has helped Camera Obscura Gallery become a center for learning and viewing by visitors from all over the world. A large contingent of volunteers help keep Camera Obscura Gallery vibrant with new shows, and with publication of the Photography in the Fine Arts Newsletter authored by Hal and his associate, Loretta Young-Gautier. The newsletter is distributed by regular mail to over two thousand art lovers and collectors worldwide.

Hal Gould, a photographer and artist himself, trained as a portrait painter at the Art Institute of Chicago in the 1940s. Inspired by the work of Alfred Stieglitz and Man Ray, he also studied photography at the Art Institute of Chicago and at Ray Vogue School of Photography. He then operated his own commercial studio for 25 years, photographing a in wide range of styles from portraits to architecture. Camera Obscura Gallery’s assistant director, Loretta Young-Gautier, is also a photographer and has worked with Hal Gould for 15 years as assistant curator, book-buyer and editor of the Photography in the Fine Arts Newsletter. She studied with several masters of Darkroom manipulation including multiple image master Jerry N. Uelsmann.

The Camera Obscura Gallery
1309 Bannock Street
Denver, Colorado   80204
303-623-4059

Open Tuesday–Saturday 10 AM to 6 PM. Sunday by appointment. Closed Mondays

Philip Hyde Photography Now at Weston Gallery

January 31st, 2010

Black And White Prints

(See the photograph full screen: Click Here.)

Surf, Rocks, Point Lobos State Reserve, California, 1949, by Philip Hyde. Part of an Assignment from Minor White, lead instructor at Ansel Adam's Photography Department at the California School of Fine Arts now the San Francisco Art Institute.

ANNOUNCMENT:

A selection of Yosemite National Park and Point Lobos State Reserve Philip Hyde contact 4X5 and 5X7 vintage black and white prints

NOW AVAILABLE AT:

THE WESTON GALLERY

6th Avenue and Delores Street

Carmel, CA   93921

831-624-4453

Ask for Richard Gadd, Gallery Director

Philip Hyde will soon be added to the Weston Gallery Website, a link will be provided and a more official announcement will be made…

For those not within driving distance of Carmel, a small number of vintage photography school era (1946-1950) contact 4X5 and 5X7 Philip Hyde original black and white prints, as well as a few 8X10 vintage original black and white prints, are currently being shown privately. The 4X5 and 5X7 contact prints are not signed by Philip Hyde, but carry his working print “Proof” stamp or “Exhibition Only” stamp. The 8X10 and larger vintage silver prints are signed.

A Photography School Era Vintage Black and White Print Exhibition in the San Francisco Bay Area is in the works for this year. Dates to be finalized later this Spring when the gallery finishes moving into a new space.

COMING SOON TO PHILIP HYDE.COM…A description of Philip Hyde’s modifications and updates to the silver gelatin printing process for black and white prints, with variations as originally taught by Ansel Adams, Edward Weston and Minor White at the California School of Fine Arts, now the San Francisco Art Institute.